Lifestyle

Burnett: Rainy days have given this area ideal planting conditions

The Kelowna Garden Club is holding its annual flower show at Guisachan Heritage Park on July 7 and it’s less than two weeks away.

Here is your chance to see the fabulous Gardens and at the same time be entertained with an arts and crafts show, flower arranging demos, a display by the Orchid Society and a special floral art display.

Also, there will be Master Gardeners on hand to answer your gardening questions.

The highlight of the event is the juried flower show where anyone can enter something from the garden for ribbons and trophies.

All this and there is no admission fees to the park and no entry fees for the flower show.

If you are entering something in the show you must get it there between 7:45 a.m. and 9 a.m. Ribbons and prizes will be awarded at 3 p.m., as will the trophy for the aggregate winner.

At 1:30 p.m., I will be giving a talk and a walkabout in the gardens from a historical prospective.

For more information and details on the 27 categories you can enter check out the web site at www.kelownagardenclub.ca.

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This stretch of rainy weather has been a bit unusual for the Okanagan but to put a positive spin on it first of all we can always use the water and it has given us ideal planting conditions for this time of the year.

I’ve even done some transplanting in the perennial garden which normally would not have been done due to heat.

Please don’t, however, become complacent when it comes to watering new plantings even though we are getting this rain.

A new plant can only get the water it needs directly from its root system and when the roots do not reach out it doesn’t matter how much rain we get the plant will suffer.

Give newly transplanted plants a drink directly at the root zone regularly until they become established. Often this takes a month or two.

If you have any bare spots in your lawn due to dog spotting or heavy traffic this weather is perfect for re-seeding.

Just scratch up the area with a rake or cultivator and apply some top dress composed of half peat and half sand.

You can also use a good clean sandy top soil. Broadcast the grass seed over the area and scratch it in with a rake.

Water it regularly when its not raining of course and you should have a good result in about a month.

I noticed a number of fruit and vegetable stands are opening up for the season and I encourage everyone to get out and support them.

We still have a vibrant farming community here in the Okanagan and it is important they get our business.

We are so lucky to have them so close at hand compared to other parts of the country.

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