Lifestyle

Hopper: Mystery illness finds diagnosis

Kevin was a very successful top executive for a large information technology corporation.

He was happily married and had five beautiful children.

He was healthy, happy and had life by the tail —or so it seemed.

With his success, he did what most people do —he bought a bigger and better house to go with his booming career.

And that’s when life began to go sideways for Kevin.

Although Kevin’s new house seemed like a dream home on the outside, it was actually a toxic stew on the inside.

It wasn’t long after moving into the house that both Kevin and his wife started to become sick.

In retrospect, Kevin realizes that it was probably a combination of mold exposure, the constant exposure to all of the chemicals in the new textiles in the house and stress that created the ‘perfect storm,’ one that tipped him over the edge and into an abyss of illness and suffering.

Kevin’s health started to slowly deteriorate. He began to react to common chemicals that were found in cleaning products, laundry products and perfumes.

After seeing many different specialists to no diagnosis avail, he finally decided to go to the Mayo clinic, a final attempt to put his mystery illness behind him and move on with his life.

But this mysterious illness, which was now affecting his ability to work and support his family, had even stumped a team of specialists at the Mayo Clinic.

All the tests he underwent came back negative, as the Mayo Clinic medical experts couldn’t diagnose what was making Kevin so sick.

One of the most baffling and debilitating symptoms for Kevin was his lack of cognitive function.

He suffered from severe and chronic brain fog and at times could barely put a sentence together.

And with every exposure to chemicals in everyday life, the symptoms continued to get worse.

Kevin was finally diagnosed with multiple chemical sensitivities. On the recommendation of his environmental doctor, he drove 1,600 miles in his van from New Mexico to Victoria to attend a dynamic neural retraining system program.

Kevin slept in his van over the three days it took to travel to Vancouver Island, as sleeping in a hotel was impossible due to the illness. His perseverance and determination to make this long journey would prove to be the most important decision of his life.

Kevin embraced adopting a neuroplasticity program for him that was based on rewiring circuits in his brain that had been altered by chemical injury.

“Six months ago I was living a secluded, sheltered life in a remote area in New Mexico. Due to illness, I had to be physically separated from my wife and children and lived in a travel trailer that I had retrofitted with non-toxic materials,” he recalled.

“I couldn’t travel or go into any other buildings and could only work on my computer for a couple of hours. My cognitive function was also affected and my life was very small.”

After coming to the realization he had suffered a chemical brain injury that affected his ability to function in the world.

“I learned how to rewire the circuits in my brain that had become disorganized through trauma, and amazingly, the symptoms are gone, and I can live a normal life again. It’s hard to believe how different my life is in such a short time.”

And I am happy to report that Kevin is now fully recovered and chooses daily to live a healthy and environmentally aware lifestyle.

He travels on a regular basis now—and best of all, he can travel by plane with his wife to visit his children. You can view Kevin’s video testimonial at http://youtu.be/jUBEBaq2MRA.

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