Lifestyle

Flu vaccination benefits outlined

Flu season is approaching and public health nurses across Interior Health are gearing up for the launch of this year’s influenza (flu) vaccination campaign.

Public flu clinics will begin in some Interior Health communities next week.

This year, IH is trying to counter what they say is misinformation about flu vaccines.

“There are many myths and misconceptions about the flu shot so it’s important for people to get accurate information to help them stay healthy,” said Dr. Rob Parker, medical health officer with Interior Health. “For example, the flu shot cannot give you the flu. The vaccine used in B.C. contains dead influenza viruses that cannot cause infection.”

In years when influenza is widespread in B.C., hundreds of people may die from influenza or its complications, such as pneumonia.

“The two most important ways to protect yourself from getting the flu are to wash your hands frequently and get your flu shot,” said Parker. “Flu vaccinations are a proven, safe and effective way to reduce your chances of getting the flu. The flu shot also lessens the severity of symptoms for those who do get the flu.”

In B.C. the flu vaccine is free for:

•  people 65 years and older and their caregivers and household contacts

• all children between six-months-old and five-years-old

• household contacts and caregivers of infants up to five-years-old

• children and adults with chronic health conditions and their household contacts

• aboriginal people

• children and adolescents, aged six-months old to 18 yearsold, with conditions treated for long periods of time with Aspirin or ASA, and their household contacts

• residents of nursing homes and other chronic care facilities

• pregnant women who will be in their third trimester during influenza season and their household contacts (pregnant women who are in other high risk groups can be immunized at any time during the pregnancy)

• health care and other care providers in facilities and community settings who are capable of transmitting influenza disease to those at high risk of influenza complications

• people who provide essential community services (first responders, corrections workers)

• people who work with live poultry and/or swine

• individuals who provide care or service in potential outbreak settings housing high risk persons.

“The flu shot is anywhere from 60 to 90 per cent effective in preventing influenza and if you don’t get it you can’t spread it,” Parker said.

To find a flu clinic near you, check out the IH website www.interiorhealth.ca.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

You might like ...

Austin endorses Cullen
 
Resource issues dominate Terrace all candidates meeting
 
VIDEO: Witnesses describe scene at Parliament Hill; Raw footage of Ottawa shootings
Heart of Our City: Jasper Nolos gets reacquainted with home
 
Security stepped up in B.C. after attacks in Ottawa
 
John York running for Cranbrook mayor
Refugee living the Canadian dream
 
High demand for Oliver jail-jobs seminars
 
Diverse group of panelists discuss potential pros and cons of LNG in Prince Rupert

Community Events, October 2014

Add an Event

Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Oct 24 edition online now. Browse the archives.