Lifestyle

Finding inner peace to simplify our lives

The truth we seek is a unique and personal adventure to help make our complicated lives more simple, says Judy Guido, a national speaker with the Inner Peace Movement of Canada.

Guido was in Kelowna this week to talk about how the best way to find our truth is participation with others.

“As we learn to trust ourselves and the power of team we set the stage for prosperity and fulfillment. Everything changes and nothing is stagnant and when we realize the meaningful qualities we see in others are facets of ourselves then we release competition and embrace cooperation,” said Guido.

The Inner Peace Movement of Canada a non-profit educational program, helps people recognize their true worth and be involved in a positive, constructive way with their loved ones, their community and themselves.

The two forums hosted by Guido this week at the Best Western Hotel  were intended to teach participants how to keep life simple, joyful and fun.

“They will gain more understanding about their life purpose, the seven-year cycles of life, and communication with their team of guardian angels,” said Guido, who lives in Lake Country.

“Participants also hear about the four spiritual avenues of communication—intuition where you may ‘hear’ messages from your angels; vision when you may ‘see’ pictures and visions in your mind’s eye; prophecy where you may just know what will happen next and feeling is when you bring healing through touch.”

Guido is an educator in the field of self awareness.

Her goal is to inspire people to believe in themselves and live their potential by realizing there is no limit to what we can accomplish.  Her message is one of hope and coming home to inner peace.

“It’s about trying to find a balance between thought and feeling,” Guido explained.

“Out of balance can be recognized by seeing people who think and think and think about things, they analyze and dissect but never put those thoughts into action.

“On the other end are the daydreamers who are trying to envision everything all the time rather than just being.”

Guido says ultimately we all have to learn to trust our own intuition, to not be afraid to listen to the little voice inside ourselves.

“You have to listen to your gut feelings, not to analyze and dissect everything, but just to trust ourselves.:

Guido said she became involved in the Inner Peace Movement philosophy in seeking out practical ways to juggle her active social, business and family lives.

“Instead of worrying about everything all the time, I just learned to relax, to be loyal to myself and to trust myself,” she said.

Guido said she has lived in Oyama on an orchard since 1991 when she and her husband, an engineer, opted to leave Vancouver for a quieter lifestyle.

They have since raised two kids, been involved in several businesses and live  on and operate a farm orchard.

“I’ve had a wonderful life but the tools and techniques I have learned have allowed it to unfold the way it has,” she said.

“I just want to pass on that knowledge to others.”

 

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