Lifestyle

Travel: Canadian experience visiting Maritimes

Aaron Young

contributor

Canada’s Atlantic and Maritime Provinces are loaded with history and tourist destinations.

Travelling into PEI from New Brunswick you experience a feat of engineering on the Confederation Bridge, the world’s longest marine span bridge.

PEI is the land that captivated Anne in Lucy Maud Montgomery’s stories and Green Gables Heritage Place is famous around the world.

Close by is Cavendish National Park with its smooth sand, red sandstone cliffs and the white-capped waves. Later, enjoy a scenic drive to the Island Preserve Company in New Glasgow, which is a purveyor of fine preserves and teas ware and hosts a beautiful seasonal waterside restaurant.

Before leaving stop in the quaint town of Victoria by the sea to see the second oldest lighthouse in PEI.

Onto Nova Scotia, enjoy the scenic views on your way to Peggy’s Cove. Known as the idyllic fishing village, Peggy’s Cove is one of most popular stops in Atlantic Canada. Set on rocky shores, the lighthouse and village are a photographer’s paradise. Then up through the Cabot Trail, for one of the most scenic drives on the Atlantic coast. It is a full day with stops in Margaree Harbour and Cheticamp, a Quaint Acadian fishing village famous for its beautiful hooked rugs.

To get from Nova Scotia to Newfoundland you must take a six-hour ferry crossing which departs Cape Breton and arrives in Port Aux Basques. Once on Newfoundland soil however, the fun begins “Newfie style” as the locals say.

Cornerbrook has over four kilometres of beautiful red interlocking brick sidewalks, heritage lights and green spaces. For those interested in British world naval history, stop at the Captain James Cook Historical Site before heading to Saint Anthony, set among the mystical rugged ocean coastline and vast wilderness of pristine valleys and lake-dotted mountains. Slightly north lays the historic L’Anse aux Meadows. This site likely represents the first European contact with the New World, more than 1,000 years ago—500 years before Columbus. The Norstead Viking Village at L’Anse aux Meadows and the World Heritage Viking Site has been identified as one Canada’s top 10 hidden travel gems.

Heading south again, drive through Gros Morne National Park, the second oldest park in Canada encircled by tiny seaside communities, and encompassing forests and striking cliffs and shorelines.

Visit Rocky Habour and the famous Lobster Cove Lighthouse. Built in 1897 this lighthouse features interpretive exhibits about how people made their living from the sea for more than 4,000 years.

Finally, end your journey through Canada’s most eastern province by visiting its most eastern city Saint John’s. Melded with culture, history and personality, Saint Johns is the perfect little city to close off a Canadian experience of a lifetime.

Getting there: Sunwest Tours offer a competitive and detailed tour package, with offices in Kelowna, Vernon and Penticton. Call 1-800-667-3877 or book online at www.sunwesttours.com.

Aaron Young handles business development and marketing for Sunwest Tours in Kelowna.

aaron@sunwesttours.com

 

 

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