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Steele: Aquatic centre garden showcased

Easy care  drought tolerant plants—thrift, blue fescue, hen & chicks and sedums—are adapted to growing in rocks and prefer good drainage. In addition to the flowers, variation in foliage colour and texture adds year-round interest to this garden. - Gwen Steele/Contributor
Easy care drought tolerant plants—thrift, blue fescue, hen & chicks and sedums—are adapted to growing in rocks and prefer good drainage. In addition to the flowers, variation in foliage colour and texture adds year-round interest to this garden.
— image credit: Gwen Steele/Contributor

Please join me on Tuesday, July 5, 7 p.m.,  at the unH2O Xeriscape Demonstration Garden, at 4075 Gordon Dr., in front of the H2O Aquatic Centre for a free tour of the garden.

I will be talking about the many plants that are in bloom in each of the five theme gardens. And answering questions.

This is a great opportunity to see the lush, colourful plants that thrive without irrigation in the Mediterranean, native plant and rock gardens.

Some species in bloom in the Mediterranean garden include Oenothera missouriensis (Missouri evening primrose), nepeta walker’s low and lavender.

By next week the German statice should be in bloom and the thread-leaf coreopsis.

The native garden has mock orange and ocean spray shrubs blooming as well as brown-eyed Susans.

The rock gardens have abundant blooms on several varieties of ground-cover sedum (stonecrop) and well as the sempervivims (hens and chicks).

The thrift plants that produced masses of deep pink pom poms in early spring were dead-headed about a month ago and are now beginning to bloom again.

The blue fescue grasses in the rock gardens are blooming and will need to have their flowers trimmed before they go to seed or we will have baby plants everywhere.

We are just turning the irrigation on this week for the butterfly garden and the taller section of the ornamental grass garden.

The plants in these gardens need a small amount of water through the hot, dry weather.

The yarrows and Salvia I wrote about a few weeks ago are still blooming abundantly.

The echinacea and rudbeckia should begin showing colour by next week.

Two types of low bluebells are covered in flowers and the threadleaf coreopsis are just starting to open.

Stella d’Oro daylilies began flowering about two weeks ago in the ornamental grass garden.

Hopefully by next Tuesday, my favourite aster frikartii will begin complementing them with its four months long display of blue daisies.

This tour is part of 50 events the Central Okanagan Naturalist Club has organized to celebrate their 50th anniversary year.

The second part of the evening will be a guided tour of the Central Okanagan Community Garden Society’s new community garden opened this spring off Lexington Drive opposite the Mission Creek dog park, located behind the H2O Centre.

Heather Doheny, master gardener and the garden facilitator will be the tour guide of this thriving new garden.

 

 

Gwen Steele is executive director of the non-profit Okanagan Xeriscape Association. Learn more about gardening with nature and plants for the Okanagan at the website www.okanaganxeriscape.org.

 

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