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Poking in ponds great way to learn science

Youngsters from Chute Lake elementary learn about life in wetlands at Michaelbrook Marsh with Science Opportunities for Kids staff, who will be putting on summer camps for kids as well. - Doug Farrow/contributor
Youngsters from Chute Lake elementary learn about life in wetlands at Michaelbrook Marsh with Science Opportunities for Kids staff, who will be putting on summer camps for kids as well.
— image credit: Doug Farrow/contributor

Exploring the life cycles of critters that live in ponds, experimenting with chemical reactions and tracking how sunlight equals energy are all on the agenda this summer for youngsters enrolled in a Science Opportunities for Kids camp.

And, a group of youngsters from Chute Lake elementary got a taste last week of what a SOKS summer camp would be like.

Camp staff Aja Hann, Katie Macdonald and Jeff Kerkovius guided youngsters in a study of pond water at Michaelbrook Marsh, searching for invertebrates and identifying them, and generally exploring their outdoor environment from a different point of view—using all their senses.

This year’s week-long science camps for kids will be held at the Francophone School L'Ecole L'anse-au-Sable, across Gordon Drive from the H20 and Capital News Centres, with the first camp July 2 to 6 and the last of the summer from Aug. 20 to 24.

Juniors, aged six to eight years, attend Electron Camp, which is 9 a.m. to noon for five days, while seniors, nine to 13, attend Proton Camp, which is 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. four days and 1 to 4 p.m. on Mondays.

This summer, the camp options are Morphing, Mud, Magic and Quantum Mechanics: studying life cycles, chemical reactions, tracking how sunlight equals energy and inventing a greener future; or Animals, Wildlife Companion and Domestic: habitats, who lives in our forests, rural co-existence with wild animals, caregiving for and with animals, who is on the farm and are they sustainable.

SOKS camps are hands-on, interactive and mind boggling science for kids, with one day spent outdoors all day, explains program coordinater Jennifer French, who has been running these camps and other SOKS projects for 17 years in Kelowna.

That includes classroom and community presentations, Saturday Science workshops, sales of ladybugs to combat aphids, at the Farmer’s Market and other locations, creation of a teacher’s guide to the Okanagan Watershed and a community public art project.

Youngsters learn about all facets of science and are encouraged to apply it to daily activities as well as seeing science in action.

For more information and to register youngsters for a camp, go to the website at: www.soks.ca

or call 763-4427.

jsteeves@kelownacapnews.com

 

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