News

Winery encourages interactive art

Jaine Buse (right) and David Leroux work on their pieces of art at Artists in Action at House of Rose Winery Saturday. The event allowed spectators to watch the artists and ask questions about their paintings as they worked on them. - Wade Paterson/Capital News
Jaine Buse (right) and David Leroux work on their pieces of art at Artists in Action at House of Rose Winery Saturday. The event allowed spectators to watch the artists and ask questions about their paintings as they worked on them.
— image credit: Wade Paterson/Capital News

For many artists, solitude is important.

It allows them to focus on their piece of art without any sort of distraction.

But, for others, distractions can actually improve works of art.

That's what David Leroux said as he set up his canvas at House of Rose Winery Saturday.

"Sometimes people make suggestions and it actually makes the painting better," said Leroux.

Leroux and three other painters were showing off their work at Artists in Action this weekend.

While those visiting the winery had the chance to look at the artists' paintings, they also had the chance to watch the artists work on a new project.

The event, which was hosted by House of Rose Winery every Saturday and Sunday throughout July, is beneficial to three groups of people.

The artists get to display their work at a winery that gets a fair amount of traffic in the summer.

The winery is able to entertain its customers and provide them with a unique experience.

And the customer is able to interact with the artists and find out exactly what's going through their minds as they work on their creations.

"Some people are really interested, they come and stand there for half an hour, talking with the artists. Other people just glance," said Wouter Vanderhall, owner of House of Rose Winery.

"The unique thing about this is that the artists are working on pieces while they're here. That is something that we thought would help increase the interactions."

Jaine Buse was also showing off her art Saturday.

"People are really interested in the process; people who aren't artists don't know what that is," said Buse.

When asked whether or not it is distracting to have people watching her as she works, Buse said: "Some of us are motivated by it and some find it distracting. I love it because it creates energy—I love to get feedback and hear people talk about it."

Vanderhall said that he hopes to keep the Artists in Action event running in future years with the possibility of showcasing other types of art like sculptures.

"The artists enjoy being here, so we will continue it," said Vanderhall.

wpaterson@kelownacapnews.com

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