Cap News Throwback Thursday: 1962

After 86 years of service, we wanted to utilize our amazing treasure trove of Kelowna history and share it with you

Over the last 86 years the Kelowna Capital News has served the Central Okanagan – and over the last 86 years it has printed a whole lot of papers. A conservative estimate puts it at around 8,000 editions.

Each Thursday we will present Cap News Throwback Thursday at kelownacapnews.com for a fun little peek into the past, and we will re-visit those editions here in print on Fridays.

Today we present the Kelowna Capital News – Wednesday July 4, 1962 edition.

While Okanagan Lake has remained quiet for the last few months, due to flooding, it was a hot spot of activity in 1962.

The cover of the Capital News in July 1962 showed off a ‘ski bird’ photo.

“Four daring young Kelowna men, all ardent water skiers, took to the air on Monday evening much to the astonishment of onlookers,” reads the photo caption.

Using a custom built kite, towed behind an 18-foot boat, Bill Gaddes, Barry Black, Fred Schuler and Jerry Mills rose to heights of 50 feet above the lake.

“Kite skiing demands that the participants be expert water skiers and in top physical condition.”

In other big news, gas stations throughout the Kelowna region were now going to be able to stay open until midnight, thanks to a new bylaw. The bylaw was passed after a vote by gas station operators in the city.

“Mayor Parkinson expressed his gratification at the progressive and service-minded attitude shown by the operators in voting for the extended business hours,” reads the article. In 2017 of course, the majority of stations are now open 24/7.

Temperatures in June 1962 were significantly lower than the same days in 2017. According to a chart in this paper, the daily high on June 25, June 26 and 27, respectively, were 26.6 C, 22.2 C and 21.6 C.

In 2017, the daily high for June 25 was 33 C, June 26 was 34.4 C and June 27 was 27.4 C.

Canadian Flying Firsts were also recorded in this edition of the Capital News. “We’ll call him Lindbergh Wright Cook” reads the headline.

According to the piece, the above aeronautical name was given to the first child in the world to be born on an airplane. The event reportedly took place on March 29, 1931 in Canada. Pilot A.L. Morfee was evacuating a first nation woman from Hudson Bay Rail Road to take her to hospital in Manitoba when the “stork arrived” on board.

On the big screen: Paramount Theatre was featuring Walt Disney’s Moon Pilot. Moon Pilot is one of Disney’s lesser known films, but caught the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s attention. The bureau protested about their portrayal in the film. First, they objected to an FBI Agent guarding an astronaut, as that was not a Bureau function. Disney changed the character into a Federal Security Officer. Once the film was released, the FBI complained the federal agent was portrayed in “a most slapstick and uncomplimentary manner.”

Fun Fact: Harold Johnston had just claimed the Kelowna Golf and Country Club’s first hole-in-one. The then new 18-hole golf course had opened to the public on June 23, 1962. Johnston was reportedly golfing in a foursome with then club president Tom Tomiye, Don Day and Eddie Sharp of Vancouver. According to the article Johnston, “aced the 15th hole, known as the water hole, when he used an eight iron. Johnston declared the ball went in ‘like it had eyes’.”

You can check out our previous throwbacks here: 1936, 1960, 1941, 1985, 1962,1983, 1994, 1971, 1940, 1968, 1992, 1978, 1985, 2003, 1940 , 1977, 1968 and 1991.

The Capital News is now owned by Black Press Community Media. Founded in 1975, Black Press now publishes more than 170 titles in British Columbia, Alberta, Washington state, Hawaii, Ohio and California.

Do you have an important date or piece of history you hope we can find in our historical editions?! Let us know at okanagan@bpdigital.ca.


 

@carmenweld
carmen.weld@bpdigital.ca

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