Running buses had Central Okanagan drivers fuming

Public transit is considered a key tool in the reduction of emissions, but it wasn't being used very effectively during the strike.

Running buses frustrated drivers.

Public transit is considered a key tool in the reduction of emissions, but it wasn’t being used very effectively during the strike.

More cars were on the road to get people to and from work, school and various appointments.

Worse yet, said transit workers at the Hardy Street bus hub, the fleet was still running, too they were parked with engines on.

Some drivers said buses were on for about four hours Monday while the First Canada yard employees said they ran for three hours. The same was happening on Tuesday.

Meribeth Burton, a spokesperson for First Canada, explained that the reason why the 107 buses in the Kelowna regional transit fleet were running was preparedness.

“First Canada has taken all measures necessary to make sure the fleet is ready to go at a moment if and when this ends,” said Burton.

“Just like your vehicle, there can be other complications with the battery if the engine is kept off.”

Bus drivers said they thought it would be simpler to merely unplug electrical systems on the bus that could otherwise drain the batteries.

The City of Kelowna doesn’t seem to have any idling bylaws.