Exactly when the level of Okanagan Lake will peak remains uncertain. -Image: David Ogilvie

Sunday lake update: More rise and fall expected before peak reached

A fluctuating Okanagan Lake rose four centimetres over night Saturday

  • Sun Jun 11th, 2017 10:00am
  • News

Environment and Climate Change Canada reported Sunday morning that Okanagan Lake is at 343.248 metres above sea level, a four-millimetre increase over the 343.244 metre level measured yesterday morning.

The level of Kalamalka Lake this morning was recorded at 392.420 metres, down from the 392.427 metre mark yesterday morning.

Lake levels may fluctuate up and down, and ground water continue to increase for a period of time. As this is a weather dependent event, a lake level drop for a few days may not indicate the peak has been reached. Heavy rainfall associated with thunderstorms and gusty winds can cause lake levels to rise again, causing flooding and shoreline damage.

As we’re still at historic lake levels, property owners should keep their flood defences in place. Check sandbags daily and if needed, repair, replace and bolster them to ensure adequate buffer and protection in the event gusty winds challenge them. Local government public works crews continue to do this for areas that they are monitoring.

People are reminded to stay off flood protection equipment and stay away from standing water. Jumping or walking on gabions or water dams is a public safety concern and could damage or undermine the device causing ruptures and significant water flows.

The Emergency Operations Centre is continuing to assess lake levels and the impact any future weather events may have on the ongoing emergency response. At the same time, planning is underway for future demobilization and recovery once lake levels begin to decrease and it is safe to remove flood protection measures Until then, residents should keep all flood defences in place until the Emergency Operations Centre issues information on what actions to take.

There have not been any new Evacuation Orders or Alerts. Those previously issued remain in effect. Check out the map at www.cordemergency.ca/mapand search by address to determine if an area is under alert or order, or to find the closest sand and sandbag locations.

For more information, visit www.cordemergency.ca, sign up for e-updates or call the information line at 250-469-8490.

For municipal information such as boat launch, park and beach closures, and water quality advisories, visit their websites: