Opinion

Hopper: Change your brain circuitry and take control of your health

Neuroplasticity—this big word is also becoming more of a buzzword as the trend in health care turns away from traditional paradigms to new research on brain function.

The media continue to discover that this big word is indeed a topic of enormous practical importance. Understanding the brain’s innate adaptive process and its relationship to optimal health represents a revolutionary approach in healing.

Recently, neuroplasticity was also a featured topic in Time Magazine.

Through the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging, we can now see with hard evidence that the physical structure and function of a brain “in pain” is much different from a normal and healthy brain.

This technology allows us to see changes in the brain in real time.

As reported in the article, Dr. Sean Mackey, a professor of anesthesia and pain management at Stanford University, says his studies suggest that through our conscious awareness, we can learn how to act back on the brain and change the brain circuits that are responsible for pain.

Along with chronic pain, impaired brain wiring is also at the very root of illnesses like chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple chemical sensitivities, fibromyalgia and anxiety. Yet the process itself of correcting impaired brain circuitry in the brain is not a quick and easy one. In order to rewire brain function it takes personal discipline and focused dedication.

However, the resulting recovery from many chronic and often misunderstood illnesses through self directed neuroplasticity ismiraculous by any medical standard.

The time that it takes to experience a difference in physical symptoms from rewiring brain function varies from person to person. For some, it may only take a few days to notice profound changes in symptoms, while for others this shift may takes weeks or months.

Take Sharon for example, a 70-year-old woman who attended a program that I held last month in Florida.

Sharon had suffered from multiple chemical sensitivities along with an array of associated symptoms that affected her gastro-intestinal function, nervous system and immune system for 20 years.

Prior to taking the dynamic neural retraining system, Sharon had to wear a mask to go into any public environment and was very isolated in where she could go and what she could do.

Not only because of the degree of sensitivities that she suffered, but also because of the associated energy collapse and pain.

By the third day of the program, Sharon was thoroughly convinced that the condition that she had once thought of as a life sentence was finally in the process of resolving.

Her sense of smell started to return to normal and the hyper vigilance in the systems of her body began to relax again as she embraced her journey of rewiring this faulty mechanism in her brain.

The Dynamic Neural Retraining System will be the subject of a three-day seminar in Kelowna on April 29. To register, email info@dnrsystem.com.

Annie Hopper is a core belief counsellor and brain retraining specialist.

 

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