Opinion

Kaufman: Relief option for menopause symptoms

Menopause is the transitional phase of a woman’s life when menstrual function ceases, typically spanning a two to five year period.

During this time, hormonal levels in the body are fluctuating, as estrogen and progesterone levels gradually decline.

The main symptoms likely to be experienced (with varying degrees of severity) are headaches, tiredness, lethargy, irritability, anxiety, nervousness, depression, insomnia, inability to concentrate, hot flashes, and sweating.

Menopause typically occurs between the ages of 48 and 55, but menopause is a gradual physiological process that really begins with birth, and the cycle of gradual maturation and decline of a woman’s reproductive system.

This certainly agrees with the Chinese medicine view of menopause, in which menopause is not viewed as a syndrome so much as a normal transition in a women’s life that is influenced greatly by a woman’s lifestyle, emotional stress, experiences, and dietary habits.

There are many characteristics of the modern western lifestyle that can lead to increased menopausal symptoms.

Emotional stress is an extremely important cause of menopausal problems, as worry, anxiety and fear all weaken the kidneys and lead to yin deficiency.

Considering the increased stress posed on women through work and family in the past 40 to 50 years, it is not uncommon for many women to deal with ongoing overwork and stress both physical and emotional, all of which contribute to a woman’s experience during menopause.

Other impacts of a fast-paced lifestyle can be poor or rushed meals, and not having the time or energy for regular exercise or stress release.

From a Chinese medicine perspective, menopausal symptoms are generally due to a decline of the kidneys, often as either a deficiency of kidney-yin, kidney-yang, or both, each of which will present its own set of symptoms.

Sweating in the middle of the night indicates a kidney yin deficiency, whereas sweating in the early morning upon waking indicates a kidney yang deficiency.

A kidney yang deficiency will also be accompanied by a feeling of cold, especially in the feet, whereas a kidney yin deficiency will be accompanied by a feeling of heat, particularly in the chest, the palms of the hands, and the soles of the feet.

A kidney yin or yang deficiency pattern may also be combined with other patterns of imbalance, which might involve the liver, a stagnation of qi-energy, or deficiency of blood.

These imbalances can contribute to other menopausal symptoms: hot flashes, insomnia, irritability, depression, nervousness and anxiety, fatigue, palpitations, nausea, diarrhea and constipation, and stiffness, bloating, cramps and joint pain, among other symptoms.

Acupuncture offers a more natural approach to managing menopausal symptoms.

Whereas some types of menopausal treatments may have negative side-effects, acupuncture can help to manage symptoms without any negative impact on health, indeed by bringing the body into a more balanced state of functioning, health can actually be improved.

Acupuncture can help to relieve menopausal symptoms to make this transition a much more enjoyable and comfortable time of a woman’s life.

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