Hergott: Sexual favours have no place in a moving vehicle

Today’s column was a bit of a struggle for me. Usually, the trick is coming up with a topic that I feel passionate about.

Today’s column was a bit of a struggle for me.

Usually, the trick is coming up with a topic that I feel passionate about.

Armed with a good topic, my columns seem to write themselves.

I just sit here with my hands over the keys of my laptop and away it goes.

This week, a friend gave me a most excellent topic—one that I feel passionate about in more than one way, but my fingers had a whole lot of trouble getting started.

My column last week was about the serious problem of driving drowsy.

A crash near Vernon triggered that topic.  I challenged the use of the word “accident” to describe a crash arising from drowsy driving because falling asleep at the wheel is the predictable result of intentional driving behaviour.

Nobody intends or chooses to get sleepy while driving, but we all know when we are getting drowsy.

The dangerous, and intentional, choice is to push on and not pull over to rest.

The topic I was given this week is about an entirely different kind of dangerous driving behaviour.

Like talking on a cell phone, texting, eating food, changing clothes, applying makeup, reading and even playing video games, this particular type of activity distracts the driver from the important task at hand—driving.

And I don’t know if “distracts” is a strong enough word.

According to one survey, approximately 15 per cent of drivers admit to having engaged in some form of this particularly distracting type of activity while driving.

There is a time and a place for everything, and there most certainly is a time and a place for this type of activity.

In fact, I think that a large portion of our population, perhaps just under 50 per cent, would be inclined to actively encourage it.

Have you ever heard of “road head?”

To be fair, the survey wasn’t restricted to that particular sexual activity.

Sexual activity doesn’t have to include a partner.

Perhaps more often it’s a matter of one “task at hand” competing with giving full attention to another.

What was your first reaction when you realized what I was writing about?  The topic was offered to me with a bit of a giggle and I found, on doing a bit of Internet research, that such a reaction is common.

Search “road head” on YouTube and you’ll find all sorts of videos taken of drivers whose passengers are in that telling position. Those behind the camera are giggling and laughing.

I had a similar reaction to the column topic, although with a bit of envy mixed in.

Why is our immediate, gut churning, reaction not one of abhorrence?

Why do we pull out a video camera instead of honking the horn to stop the activity?

We must not be clued in to the way car crashes change lives, and end them.

We must not be clued in to the fact that it’s dangerous driving choices, and not mere roll of the dice chance, that causes those crashes.

If we were clued in, our attitudes would be different; the only activity we would tolerate and engage in behind the wheel of a car would be driving.

I, for one, resolve that if I am ever presented with an offer, I will gently but firmly scold my wife and pull over to where the offer can be accepted safely.

Just Posted

Valley Road closed 24-7, for now

Kelowna road closure extended due to safety concerns to build creek retaining wall

Accused killer’s fate in the hands of Kelowna jury

The jury is expected to start deliberating this afternoon

Silver Creek RCMP search expands north

RCMP were seen collecting evidence three kilometres north of the farm where human remains were found

Above and beyond for the United Way

Local company keeps on raising money for the United Way of the Central Okanagan

Have your say on downtown parking in Kelowna

Open house scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 24.

Rally condemns violence, promotes healing

Discovery of human remains and disappearances of women have created tension in the rural community

Justice to decide court’s jurisdiction over Indigenous man

Alex Louie, also known as Senklip, is standing trial over 9 charges related to alleged gun smuggling

Province grants $784,000 for Okanagan projects

Rural Dividend grants support Okanagan community projects

B.C. NDP convention set for Victoria

Premier, federal leader Jagmeet Singh to add energy

B.C. school trustee calls LGBTQ school program ‘weapon of propaganda’

Chilliwack’s Barry Neufeld published the comments on his Facebook page

B.C. couple hope boat drone becomes first to cross Atlantic

Colin and Julie Angus of Victoria to have drone collect environmental data en route

Driver trapped for 16 hours after car flips

Member of Anarchist Mountain Volunteer Fire Department in Osoyoos made discovery while out for walk

Penticton pilots new mobile parking payment app

Eliminating the need to carry change for parking meters

Most Read