Letter: Aging power infrastructure puts public at risk

I have been shocked by recent stories in the news about the state of electrical systems in British Columbia.

To the editor:

I have been shocked by recent stories in the news about the state of electrical systems in British Columbia.

First there was news about dangerous high voltage hot spots found all over Metro Vancouver. These hot spots are the result of aging underground wires fraying and coming into contact with conductive surfaces like manhole covers and lampposts, and they are putting people and pets at serious risk of electrocution. At least one dog has already died.

Then, St. Paul’s Hospital completely lost power and had to switch to its emergency generators to keep the lights on and patients safe.

Toping it all off, news last week showed pictures of an eighty-year-old, moss-covered dam near Vancouver with visibly crumbling concrete. Let me tell you, I would not want to be standing near that dam when an earthquake hits.

So what I would like to know is how things have been allowed to get into such a state of disrepair?  Public safety should not be put in jeopardy by neglect of the electrical systems we all depend upon.

More to the point, perhaps, is when can the public expect to see British Columbia’s aging electrical systems brought back up to a safe standard and who is responsible for making sure that this happens?

Money obviously needs to be spent, but no price is too great when it comes to public safety.

Yolanda Lora Vilchis,

Surrey