Organic food criticism needs scientific backing

Although these claims seem like rumour without proof to me, they do generate fear in me.

To the editor:

Re: Heidi Osterman’s letter: Stanford Study Slams The Organic Food Industry, Sept. 25 Capital News.

In her letter, Heidi said, “Sadly, where big money flows corruption soon follows. I agree that all consumers should be wary of organic food from China.”

I am disappointed that Heidi did not provide further evidence to back up her statements. Although these claims seem like rumour without proof to me, they do generate fear in me. I ask myself: Have I been eating the wrong food?

The statements made by Heidi Osterman, a certified nutritionist, would affect not only the general consumers, but also food stores and retailers that sell organic food from China.

I call on Heidi to present her evidence, including unbiased and credible studies, that would back up her statements.

I am a common everday Canadian consumer who has little professional knowledge on nutrition. I assume all food, labelled with “certified organic” and sold in a Canadian retail store, has passed standards set forth by a North American food inspection agency or the like. After reading “Sadly, where big money flows corruption soon follows,” I have the impression that untruthfulness has occurred somewhere between food production to retail sales.

Eventually, Canadian consumers are misinformed and cheated. I call on Heidi again to inform us which food agencies are reliable and trustworthy. Should we be wary of organic food produced in other countries as well? I urge Heidi to share more professionally insightful information with all of us.

 

Henry Tam,

Kelowna