Customer Maureen Blaskovich grabs a coconut water from the backseat window of a self-driving car, a Lincoln MKZ outfitted with technology by AutoX, in San Jose, Calif. on Aug. 29, 2018. Ryan Nakashima / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Automated cars could kill wide range of jobs, federal documents say

Internal government documents show that more than one million jobs could be lost to automated vehicles, with ripple effects far beyond the likeliest professions.

Internal government documents say more than one million jobs could be lost to the coming boom in automated vehicles, with ripple effects far beyond the likeliest professions.

A federal presentation predicts automation could kill some 500,000 transportation jobs — from truck drivers to subway operators to taxi drivers and even courier services.

The Employment and Social Development Canada document suggests over 600,000 more jobs were also at risk, including parking attendants, auto-body repair workers, and even police and emergency workers.

The 2017 presentation, obtained by The Canadian Press through Access to Information, notes difficulties in retraining some of these workers, a problem the federal Liberals hope to overcome.

A recently posted report summarizing the results of federally funded public opinion research suggests the Liberals need to increase their outreach efforts if they want workers young and old to stay relevant in a changing economy and workforce.

The March report gauged workers’ attitudes as the federal government embarked on an education- and skills-development advertising campaign.

Related: New Amazon warehouse will bring 700 jobs to B.C.

Related: Health care, scientific jobs top B.C. employment forecast

The Canadian Press

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