Occupiers protest in MP’s office

The Occupy Kelowna group spent less than five minutes occupying Kelowna-Lake Country MP Ron Cannan’s office on Thursday.

The Occupy Kelowna group spent less than five minutes occupying Kelowna-Lake Country MP Ron Cannan’s office on Thursday.

The group was on hand to express their displeasure with Bill C-10.

Although Cannan was not present at the time, Robert Nisbet was the first occupier to speak to staff of the constituency office.

“This is an occupation as part of a national day of action,” said Nisbet, who was holding a ‘Stop Bill C-10’ sign.

“We’re trying to make a political statement and get our views known.”

Nisbet, along with the other occupiers were informed that they can write a letter or email to Cannan if they would like to voice their concerns.

Occupier Wes Kmet wanted to get a few words in before his exit from the MP’s office.

“Good legitimate questions are asked by the opposition, but (there are) no legitimate answers. When are we going to get decent government? They talked about accountability, transparency, it just isn’t happening,” said Kmet.

The group left after again being encouraged to submit their concerns through letters or emails.

Many have suggested that the Occupy movement isn’t coherent. With many different complaints, it’s been difficult to understand what the group’s focus is.

Occupier Brandy McNeill said perhaps that implies how many issues need to be fixed.

“It’s just proof of how many issues we have in society right now. But it gets confusing when you see protesters at every angle,” said McNeill.

“Our way to combat that is we’re trying to pick a subject each week and just go with that, because there are a lot.”

McNeill admitted that many Occupy Kelowna turnouts have been small, but she said that the occupiers are not going away.

She said that Occupy Kelowna will continue for “as long as it takes to start seeing some fundamental changes and democracy in action.”

When asked whether or not the Kelowna occupiers work, McNeill explained that most do.

“There are a few of us that are lucky enough to run our own businesses. We’re able to move our schedule around to accommodate this,” McNeill said.

“There are probably only three or four people on board that don’t work. We get smaller turnouts during weekdays because of (conflicting) work schedules.”

 

wpaterson@kelownacapnews.com