Revelstoke’s Jackie Rhind shows off her new matchstick sized pregnancy and ovulation testing strips from her company Ovry. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

Revelstoke’s Jackie Rhind shows off her new matchstick sized pregnancy and ovulation testing strips from her company Ovry. (Liam Harrap/Revelstoke Review)

Revelstoke entrepreneur launches new pregnancy testing company

The company Ovry launches this summer

One Revelstokian quit her job a year ago to start a company this summer supplying something she said is severely lacking in Canada – inexpensive, convenient and less wasteful pregnancy tests.

“I’m aiming to help empower women,” said Jackie Rhind, creator of Ovry. Rhind is also a Revelstoke city councillor.

Pregnancy tests in the grocery store can cost up to $30. However, Rhind said there is a huge markup as they probably cost less than a dollar to make.

“It makes me so mad. It’s a rip off.”

She said many companies capitalize on the vulnerability of women who are desperate for answers.

Having used grocery store pregnancy tests herself, she said buying them can have an element of shame attached.

“You buy five other items at the store to try and hide the test. And you just hope you don’t run into your boyfriend’s mom at checkout,” Rhind said.

So, Rhind found a Canadian manufacturer and launched her own pregnancy and ovulation testing company that she said is superior and more discreet.

The tests are slightly larger than a match and according to company’s website over 99 per cent accurate with prices starting at $16 for a package of four tests.

Rhind said the urine testing strips can detect pregnancy as soon as five days before an expected period.

The company’s goal is to sell across Canada online at myovry.com and eventually expand into the U.S. market. Rhind said her product is less wasteful than many others, as they are smaller and produced in Canada, rather than abroad.

One per cent of proceeds will be donated to charities that help empower women.

Rhind said launching her own business is a huge learning curve.

For example, she spent hours solely researching barcodes. Turns out there’s specific codes for online sales and in-store purchases, all dependent on expiry dates.

“I had no idea,” said Rhind.

If the company fails, Rhind said hopefully she at least brings awareness that other options for pregnancy testing exist.

Rhind had to delay her company’s launch from the spring as her manufacturer had to pivot and make COVID-19 testing strips instead to help with shortages.

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:
liam.harrap@revelstokereview.com


 

@pointypeak701
liam.harrap@revelstokereview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BirthsBusiness