Science technology career opportunities booming in British Columbia

Our education programs need to keep up with the demand for people trained to step in to technical jobs.

“British Columbia has a ready source of great jobs and careers in technology. Our education programs need to keep up with that demand.”

That is the enthusiastic opinion of John Leech, executive director of the Applied Science Technologists and Technicians of BC.

“Every system we rely on—water, roads and transportation, telecommunications and Internet, hydro and natural gas, environment, health, forestry, and many more —utilizes engineering and applied science technology professionals working in the background. B.C.’s telecom and IT, animation and many other sectors produce new careers every month.”

ASTTBC has more than 10,000 members currently working in thousands of careers available to graduates of two-year diploma programs available at the British Columbia Institute of Technology and other B.C. colleges and institutes including Okanagan College.

“Our members enjoy rewarding, well-paid and often recession-proof careers in public service and the private sector alike,” Leech stated.

“For huge numbers of young men and women, technology is the answer.

“In B.C. and across Canada, technology permeates every workplace and job. We need to get capable students involved and engaged in applied sciences and head off workforce shortages by building a B.C. ‘Science and Technology Culture.’”

Leech calls on government for renewed efforts to build student skills and confidence in math and science programming.

“We especially need to interest young students in science and how things work. Young students use technology every day—smart phones, iPads and computers. They play video games, even build robots.” Leech lauds the recent “Year of Science” program that encouraged students toward so-called “STEM” subjects—science, technology, engineering and math.

Citing the recent $6 million B.C. campaign to encourage careers in trades, Leech urges a similar effort to build awareness of engineering technology education and careers.

B.C. Technology Industries Association employers like Telus and BC Hydro and many smaller technology-rich companies say the single most important position they now struggle to fill is specialty technician/technologist.

Even the Canadian Council of Chief Executives expressed concern that only 37 per cent of 16- to 18-year-olds were interested in taking even one post-secondary course in sciences, according to a recent Angus Reid survey.

Leech says the opportunities for those seeking work in the technology field are considerable given a wave of retirements of present-generation B.C. technology professionals that is already underway. “Half of our membership is now middle-aged at 45-plus, and 22 per cent are over age 55,” Leech explained.

It would appear their investment is a smart move, as it will result in a broad range of career opportunities. Industries in all regions of B.C. support programs for local trainees to fill engineering and applied science technologist, technician and technical specialist positions.

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