How we share planet with other species

How We Learned to Start Worrying and Love Endangered Species, presented in Kelowna by UCLA professor Ursula K. Heise.

More than 300 years after the dodo bird became extinct, the behaviour of the industrialized world continues to put species at risk.

A lecture will be presented Thursday to address the issue.

According to the World Wildlife Fund, there are almost 20 species, including black rhinos, leatherback turtles, African wild dogs, and black spider monkeys listed as critically endangered. Dozens of others are listed as endangered or vulnerable.

Ursula K. Heise, a UCLA English professor and member of UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, speaks on Oct. 1 in Kelowna about the protection of endangered animals, and why all measures to save a species sometimes fail.

Her presentation, entitled How We Learned to Start Worrying and Love Endangered Species, is part of UBC Okanagan’s Reichwald Germanic Studies Visiting Speaker program.

Heise was a Guggenheim Fellow and served as president of the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ACLA) in 2011. She is currently the managing editor of the ACLA’s Report on the State of the Discipline.

Her research and teaching focus on contemporary environmental culture, literature and art in the Americas, Western Europe and Japan; Theories of globalization; literature and science; and the digital humanities. Her wide-ranging talk explains how society initially began to protect endangered species, and to lament their loss when conservation efforts failed.

The Reichwald Germanic Studies Visiting Speaker program, organized by UBC Okanagan’s Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies, provides an opportunity for UBC faculty, staff, students and the larger community to interact with an accomplished Canadian or international speaker/scholar with a distinguished career in any field of endeavour.

Heise’s talk takes place  at 7 p.m., Oct. 1 at the Kelowna Art Gallery 1315 Water St. This event is free and open to the public.

The visiting speaker program is made possible through the generous support of the Reichwald Germanic Studies Endowment Fund, which also sponsors a Germanic Studies visiting teaching fellowship and faculty award for research and creative activity.

 

Just Posted

Imagine Kelowna’s future this week

Four community meetings will take place on the future of the city

Accidents mount as snow falls

Kelowna drivers are having a tough time with worsening conditions

Kelowna’s global awareness festival set to go

Festival organizers get $22,800 grant from federal government to help stage this year’s events

Bus slams into truck at Kelowna intersection

A transit bus and a pick-up truck came together in the noon hour in Kelowna

Downtown Kelowna shopping mall getting face lift

The Towne Centre Mall on Bernard will be renamed and renovated inside and out

Scandia Jungle mini golf course reopening

Kelowna - Rutland Elementary students were the first ones to try the revamped course Tuesday

Castlegar homicide victim identified

The victim was 38-year-old Jordan Workman of Castlegar, B.C.

B.C. Liberal leadership candidates get one last prime-time pitch

Leadership campaign to be decided in Feb. 3 vote

Letter: Dictatorships don’t happen by accident

Kelowna letter-writer says people following Donald Trump are enabling him

Team chaplain reflects on time with Silverbacks

Kenny Toews served as a mentor and spiritual leader to the team for six seasons

Drawings connect autistic student with the world

Leifen Mitchell-Banks creates colourful cartoon characters at Salmon Arm Secondary.

Lake Country skier named Olympic alternate

Ian Deans will be a back up for the men’s ski cross team in South Korea

Andrew Scheer on trade, Trump and Trudeau

Canada’s Conservative leader begins three-day visit to B.C.

10 Safeways in Lower Mainland to close, union says

Locations in Vancouver, Burnaby, Surrey, Coquitlam, Richmond and Mission slated to shut

Most Read