Shuswap woman seeks new legs, feet for beloved pet duck and chicken

Christina Hallam gives a peck to her hen Columbus at her Tappen hobby farm. (Cameron Thomson/Salmon Arm Observer)
Christina Hallam’s pet chicken Columbus lost her toes last winter due to frostbite. (Cameron Thomson/Salmon Arm Observer)
Christina Hallam cradles her duck Millie at her hobby farm on May 15 in Salmon Arm. (Cameron Thomson/Salmon Arm Observer)
Christina Hallam’s pet duck Millie lost her toes last winter due to frostbite. Hallam is hoping the Salmon Arm Innovation Centre can 3D print some prosthetic legs for the bird. (Cameron Thomson/Salmon Arm Observer)

A Salmon Arm woman is teaming up with the local Makerspace to create prosthetic legs and feet for a chicken and duck living on her farm.

Christina Hallam lives with her husband Corwin and more than 60 farm birds on her hobby farm in Tappen, west of Salmon Arm.

Christina explains how last winter, when temperatures dropped as low as -20 C, two of her birds – a hen named Columbus and a duck named Millie – received severe frostbite on their legs and toes, and the most damaged areas had to be removed.

Read more: Prosthetic gives duckling a new leg up on life

Read more: VIDEO: Ducks on the road? Waddle they do?

A few months later, Christina started to think about ways to help her birds walk normally again. She went so far as to buy a toy Tyrannosaurus Rex and a King Kong gorilla from a thrift store, intending to repurpose the plastic legs for her birds.

Soon after purchasing the toys, Christina posted to a Shuswap Facebook page on a whim, asking if anyone had access to a 3D printer and might be able to custom design some prosthetics for Columbus and Millie. To her surprise, commenters quickly identified individuals and companies that could help.

“I got a really tremendous response I was quite impressed. I didn’t think there were many 3D printers out there,” said Christina. “This innovation company private messaged me and said they might be able to help me out.”

The organization that reached out to Christina was the Salmon Arm Innovation Centre, whose staff have enthusiastically offered their 3D printing services and know-how.

“I think it’s a great opportunity because who doesn’t like cute ducks?” said Thomas Briginshaw, executive director of the Salmon Arm Innovation Centre. “If we can help them get feet, of course we’d be happy to help and print whatever we can.”

Read more: Lake Country family sad they can’t keep their pet chickens

Read more: What makes chickens happy? University of Guelph researchers try to find out

Regarding the challenges that 3D printing prosthetic chicken and duck legs presents, the Innovation Centre is open to working with animal specialists to create the right kind of foot for the bird. There are also 3D printing plans that already exist online that could be modified for each unique leg.

“I think we can do it, I hope we can do it. I think it’s a cool project and something that will give the 3D printers who come here regularly something to work on too,” Briginshaw said.

The planning and design process between Christina and the Innovation Centre is to start next week.


@SalmonArm
newsroom@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Central Okanagan schools ready to welcome students back

Students are set to go back to school next Monday, June 1

Van runs over fire hydrant, spraying water into West Kelowna mobile home park

The incident occurred around 5:40 p.m. near Boucherie Road

North and Central Okanagan on flood watch

Kalamalka Lake users are asked to take measure to reduce the risk… Continue reading

Okanagan-shot film “The Colour Rose” wins two cinematography awards

Locations in the Okanagan were used such as; The Casorso residence, BNA, Father Pandosy, Venture Academy and Idabel Lake Resort

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

Feds delay national action plan for missing and murdered Indigenous women

Meanwhile, the pandemic has exacerbated the violence facing many Indigenous women and girls

Morning Start: How long can humans hold their breath underwater?

Your morning start for Thursday, May 2020.

100 miles in 24 hours: a B.C. man’s mission to support the less fortunate

Merrit’s Darius Sam felt a responsibility to help his community after encounter with a starving woman

Houseboat company partly owned by Shuswap MLA withdraws controversial ad

The ad welcomed houseboaters from other provinces, contradicting anti COVID-19 measures.

Squabble between campers in North Shuswap leads to bear spraying

An argument over late night partying escalated into a fight which led to one person being sprayed

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

COLUMN: Canada needs to remember rural communities as thoughts turn to pandemic recovery

Small towns often rely on tourism, which has been decimated by COVID-19

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

Most Read