The Recycling Council of B.C. offers ways to keep those Halloween night jack-o-lanterns out of the landfill. (Pixabay image)

Ways to take the waste out of Halloween

Everything from homemade costumes to pumpkin cheesecake can reduce the tonneage heading to landfills

For some, the thought of landfill-bound trash bags laden with candy wrappers and decorations in the days following Oct. 31 is far more frightening than any haunted house.

According to some tips released by the Recycling Council of BC, there are plenty of ways to reduce waste while still enjoying everything the spooky season has to offer.

When getting houses ready for the coming trick-or-treaters, the Recycling Council recommends that haunted house hosts purchase durable decorations which can be used year after year. Another way to reduce waste is to get crafty and create homemade Halloween decorations from materials that are either easily recyclable or already around the house.

Read More: Malakwa woman a part of Food Network holiday baking championship

Read More: Dressing backwards will earn you a free 7-Eleven slurpee

The hallmark Halloween decoration, the jack-o-lantern, is as synonymous with the holiday as the words trick-or-treat. The recycling council suggests those who have garden space to spare try their hands at growing their own pumpkins. Once the candles have been snuffed, instead of tossing pumpkins in the trash, they can be used as the key ingredient in a delicious pie or cheesecake. Whatever is left over after carving should be composted if possible.

When selecting what to hand out to trick-or-treaters, the recycling council recommends products with less packaging or eco-friendly packaging.

Read More: VIDEO: Does your dog hate wearing a Halloween costume?

Read More: Column: Halloween excitement builds as candy bowl empties

Costumes play an important role in the Halloween festivities, but instead of purchasing a costume which will only be used once, the recycling council offers alternatives, such as making costumes from household materials or clothing items purchased from thrift stores. Other ways to reuse costumes include setting up a costume swap to ensure last year’s costumes make it out for another year, and renting costumes where that service is offered. It is suggested those who aren’t swapping or returning their costumes give them to local theatre groups or school drama programs.

When the sun has set, the costumes are on and it’s time to head out trick-or-treating, the recycling council recommends sticking close to home to save money on gasoline, and to mingle with the other trick-or-treaters in the neighbourhood. The use of reusable bags such as cloth pillowcases is recommended, and when the inevitable candy-sampling goes on, children should be urged not to litter.


@SalmonArm
jim.elliot@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Pilot project aims to boost entrepreneurial women in the Okanagan

W Venture, a collaborative project, is open for applications until the end of July

Cyclist struck by vehicle in West Kelowna

The cyclist was transported to hospital by ambulance

Police searching for missing Lake Country man

David Anthony Jenken, 65, was reported missing Friday and was last seen on June 28

‘Justice for Mona’ protests planned in Kelowna, Lower Mainland

Security camera footage shows Mona Wang being dragged, stepped on during RCMP wellness check

VIDEO: Musqueam Chief captures captivating footage of bald eagle catching meal

‘This is why we have chosen to live here since time immemorial,’ Chief Wayne Sparrow’s nephew says

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Shuswap resident spots waterspout near Salmon Arm

The rare weather event was spotted early in the morning on July 4.

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

Seymour Arm landslide interrupts drinking water to 500 people

The July 3 slide damaged a water system and a logging road.

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Most Read