Domas Squinas, pictured here in Bella Coola where he held his summer camp beside the Atnarko River, was chief of the Ulkatcho community for many years. Squinas is featured in Sage Birchwater’s Chilcotin Chronicles. (Harlan Smith photo)

Author brings history of Chilcotin to print

Sage Birchwater holds slideshow presentation for his book Chilcotin Chronicles in Vernon Dec. 6

It’s a history that has been passed from generation to generation through spoken word.

But, after countless hours of research and transcribing, Sage Birchwater transferred that oral history of the central Interior into the written word in his 2017 book, Chilcotin Chronicles, for which Birchwater will hold a book signing at Bookland Dec. 5 and slide show presentation at Okanagan Regional Library’s Vernon branch Dec. 6.

“A lot of history that was told of British Columbia excluded the indigenous people, so I made a point of including that perspective,” Birchwater said.

The Island-born author was drawn to the region that lied beyond the mountains, separating the coast from the Interior. As a young man in 1973, Birchwater uprooted and headed to Williams Lake in the heart of what the locals refer to as the Cariboo-Chilcotin-Coast, where he has remained for more than four decades.

In the Cariboo-Chilcotin, Birchwater picked up the pen full-time and became a reporter with Black Press. And it’s a newspaper-bred style that has carried over to his book writing work.

“I apply the journalistic principle of telling a balanced story,” Birchwater said. “Each of my stories might have taken a month to research.”

After a brief introduction from Birchwater, Chilcotin Chronicles: Stories of Adventure and Intrigue from British Columbia’s Central Interior begins with the roots of the province’s first European contact and the Royal Proclamation of 1763, and stops off at turning points in the region’s formation — such as the gold rush and Chilcotin War — while focusing on the lives and stories of influential Cariboo-Chilcotin-Coast residents like Domas Squinas, James Lee (Jim) Holt and Louisa (One-Eye) Turner.

“What was fascinating for me was connecting some of the ancient people to the people of today,” Birchwater said. “The Chilcotin is such a small community — a big area, but small community.”

Now semi-retired from his role as a journalist, Birchwater continues to write historical columns for a William’s Lake newspaper, allowing him to connect with a larger audience and learn more about the history of his beloved region.

“One of the interesting things of doing a piece in the paper is people read it and give feedback,” Birchwater said, adding that readers often will provide him with leads and information on historical figures and events.

From going over archived reports and records, to interviewing local elders and transcribing their stories, it’s a process that Birchwater loves.

“It’s a lot of fun to be able to put it down and go back to them and say, ‘Is this the story you told me?’” Birchwater laughed, noting how details of a story change each time an oral history is told.

With nearly a dozen books under his belt and hundreds of newspaper articles, Chilcotin Chronicles is a work Birchwater is proud to share with Vernon audiences.

“It’s a history told from the perspective of the people in the Interior,” Birchwater said. “I really worked hard to get the full story.”

Birchwater will sign copies of Chilcotin Chronicles Dec. 5 at Bookland from noon to 2 p.m. and present a slide show at the Okanagan Regional Library’s Vernon branch Dec. 6 at 7 p.m.

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