Librarian Kristy Hennings helps at the book table at last year’s Spoke Literary Festival reading held at the Vernon branch of the Okanagan Regional Library. (Kristin Froneman photo)

Spoke literary festival returns to Vernon

Okanagan literary festival puts Vernon on the map with award-winning writers hosting workshops

There’s a novelist who’s written a bestseller about Daniel Boone, a non-fiction writer who voyages to Antarctica, an award-winning playwright whose work is currently being staged in Saskatchewan, and a poet whose name is more or less synonymous with creative writing in the Okanagan.

The lineup of big and local names hosting workshops at the upcoming second annual Spoke Literary Festival, Aug. 11-13, means Okanagan writers don’t have to go far to learn from some of the best in Canadian literature.

“You don’t have to go to a big centre to get a really high quality writing workshop experience,” says Spoke Literary Festival organizer Kerry Gilbert, an Okanagan College English professor who helped plan last year’s inaugural event along with colleagues Hannah Calder and Michelle Doege.

The two-day event was such a success, they were able to build on it and draw writers whose workshops would be sought after at a major writing festival.

“Everyone is a professional writer who has experience in the publishing industry, and so it doesn’t matter what level you’re at in your writing career, there’s something for you to learn and be inspired by,” says Gilbert, adding workshops cover all literary genres, from poetry and fiction to non-fiction and playwriting, as well as other elements of the writing life.

The festival weekend kicks off with a writing circle led by Vernon poet Michelle Doege at the Caetani Cultural Centre, and Saturday evening features a reading by all workshop writers, which is hosted by poet extraordinaire and UBC Okanagan professor emeritus Sharon Thesen.

“Growing a strong writing community is a big focus for this festival,” says Calder. “In addition to the workshops, the evening events are a chance to make those connections and pick writers’ brains. The work of writing can be quite isolating, but attending readings and events like this, that’s part of being a writer.”

Fortunately for the festival and both emerging and experienced creative writers, the Okanagan has no shortage of talent to learn from and network with. Last year’s festival drew participants from across the valley and beyond, and organizers are hoping even more writers will participate this year.

“We really want to put Vernon on the map as a literary community,” says Gilbert. “That’s what we want to foster and create as a long-term goal.”

Author workshop lineup:

Alix Hawley — Pulling out the Plums: Using Research in Fiction

Jay Ruzesky — True Stories, Well Told

Corinna Chong — Making a Scene: Structure and Transitions in Short Stories

Heidi Garnett — Writing as Dream Work

Mike Poirier — The Structure of Writing a Play

Melanie Murray — Unlocking the Vault of Memory

Laisha Rosnau — Narrative Therapy

John Lent — Phrasing in Contemporary Poetry

The Spoke Literary Festival runs Aug. 11-13 at various locations in Vernon. A weekend pass, which includes four writing workshops and two literary/social gatherings, is $175 and can be purchased by following a link from the Spoke Festival website at A student scholarship is available and all workshops and events are wheelchair accessible. Festival registration closes July 31 or when spaces have been filled.

Just Posted

Keeping the Okanagan on the Federal Radar

Kelowna-Lake Country MP Stephen Fuhr’s column

Letter: Not a pretty picture, driving around Kelowna

Kelowna letter-writer says there’s a lot to dislike driving around Kelowna

Reel Reviews: Fear or love

We say, “Once again, one worth seeing, one not.”

Two people safe after falling through ice

Kelowna Fire Department urges caution around icy waters during warm weather

Missing Kelowna woman sought

RCMP are asking for assistance in locating Christine Olsen-Meissnitzer

REPLAY: B.C. this week in video

In case you missed it, here’s a look at replay-worthy highlights from across the province this week

B.C. teachers’ union to ask for higher salaries to help with shortages

B.C. starting teacher salaries are $10,000 to $15,000 lower than Ontario or Alberta says B.C. Teachers’ Federation president.

Few political staffers on Parliament Hill report sexual misconduct: survey

Sixty-five of the 266 survey respondents said they had personally experienced at least one incident of sexual harassment.

Experimental pot lab sprouting cannabis-infused drinks, new edibles

Nestled inside Canopy Growth Corp.’s sprawling marijuana facility outside Ottawa is a special laboratory

Federal committee to examine human trafficking in Canada

The Commons committee plans on holding hearings in Montreal, Toronto, Edmonton and Vancouver.

Anti-pipeline protestors block Kinder Morgan tanker near Seattle

Protest was spurred on by the 28 anti-Kinder Morgan activists arrested in Burnaby

Captain Cal Foote is Rockets’ MVP

The Rockets hand out their annual team awards Sunday at Kelowna Community Theatre

Some surprises in new book about B.C. labour movement

“On the Line” charts history of the union movement back to the 1800s

Cancer fundraiser takes to Okanagan Lake

Penticton and Naramata joining growing fundraising event

Most Read