Edwards-Haines: Heart attacks change outlook on life

A heart attack is never on anyone's list of things to do that day.

Monday, Oct. 15, 2012, started off a s just another lovely day for Marianna Sattler, then it disintegrated into the day her health changed her life.

Experiencing a heart attack was not on her list of things to do that day, but unexpectedly and quickly it knocked everything else off her list and left her facing a somewhat grim future.

As Marianna came to grips with the new reality of her life following her heart attack, she knew she needed to make some life-altering decisions.

She could either live life as usual and likely end up in the same boat again, or she could take the advice of a good friend and enroll in a lifestyle education program called CHIP that had changed her friend’s life.

Having relied on her cholesterol and blood pressure medications for years to keep her healthy, Marianna was experiencing first-hand the truth that, usually, pills only help you buy time; they don’t provide a cure.

CHIP—Complete Health Improvement Program—with its emphasis on changing one’s lifestyle by eating healthy plant-based foods, getting physically active, drinking plenty of water, and getting adequate sleep and rest seemed worth a try.

Thus, with husband Alois in tow, in 2014 Marianna embarked on the program that would ultimately see her lower both her blood pressure and cholesterol to the point where today she is on only 10 mg of her cholesterol medication —a hefty drop from the previous 80 mg.

She credits going completely plant-based in her eating and daily, brisk, hour-long walks for turning her health around.

Alois is an Austrian-trained chef, but these days he and Marianna are enjoying more vegetables, fruit, brown rice, rice noodles, lentils, soups made from legumes, curry dishes, salads, vegan cheeses, nuts, smoothies, and more, as they delve deeper into the culinary joys of vegan cooking.

Today, when asked what she thinks after going through the 12-session CHIP program, Marianna said, “It is better to invest in your health, rather than buying shares at the hospital.”

Furthermore, she’s encouraging her friends to join the upcoming 2016 CHIP program that starts Sunday, Oct. 2.

“Inform yourself how to improve your health, so you can have a better quality of life. Adopt a new lifestyle,” she enthused.

With health care costs spiraling out of control, what can CHIP do for you?

If you’re suffering from a chronic ailment such as, but not limited to, heart disease, diabetes, high cholesterol, overweight, or high blood pressure, come to one of the free one-hour information sessions and learn how CHIP’s proven results can help you.

Or, even if you don’t have any ailments, but just want to learn more about living healthy, CHIP is equally for you.

CHIP will help you make long-lasting lifestyle changes by addressing the causes of chronic disease and teaching you to use your own lifestyle as your best medicine.

Over the course of 12 informative, fun sessions, you’ll enjoy the educational videos, recipe demonstrations, food samples, guest presenters, printed materials, dynamic group discussions, and peer support.

Information sessions are on Sunday, Sept.18  6 to 7 p.m., and on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 7 to 8 p.m., at the Kelowna Lifestyle Centre, 1130 Springfield Rd.

Call 250-764-8638 for more information.

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