Find inner peace in Kelowna and Penticton

Learn to recognize and trust the messages relayed through intuition in different forms.

  • Nov. 14, 2016 11:00 a.m.

Trusting your gut and intuition is the subject of a lecture series coming to Kelowna and Penticton.

The Inner Peace Movement of Canada is a non-profit organization which has been around for over 40 years. The Inner Peace Movement is bringing an educational lecture to Kelowna on Nov. 15 and Penticton on Nov. 22.

The educational lecture focuses on recognizing and trusting the messages relayed through intuition in different forms.

Vice president of the Inner Peace Movement of Canad, Philip Ponchet found the Inner Peace Movement helped him understand different experiences he was having in life.

“I grew up in a household where there was depression which is not that uncommon. I didn’t have any idea how it was effecting me as a young adult. I started to recognize when I took some of these programs that a lot of what we experience in life, we are able to pick up thoughts and feelings from our environment and other individuals,” Ponchet said.

The feeling goes by many different names, Ponchet said, most commonly intuition.

“I’ve found that what I’ve learned through the Inner Peace Movement has really helped me to be more effective in my life. My business life, personal life and so on,” Ponchet said. “They are very practical techniques and tools, that’s why I pass it on because I found it was very effective for me.”

Ponchet’s talk focuses on the truth that can be attained through intuition.

“It’s really the thing we can fall back on to help us trust what’s happening or to know the difference between what is true for us and what isn’t,” Ponchet said.

There are a few main ways intuition speaks to people, Ponchet said, are auditory words or sounds, “gut feelings” and visually.

“There’s one of those ways that is more dominant in each person. So we help the people identify the dominant way,” Ponchet said.

“We tend to overthink in our Western world, we put a lot of emphasis on our mind, our intellect. It actually is a slower way of decision making than intuition is. Intuition gets us going where we want to be a lot faster, but it requires a bit of trust, accepting what comes to us. That’s a bit of a challenge for some people.”

Poncho is set to be joined by Penticton’s John Partington on Nov. 15 at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. in Kelowna at the Sandman Inn and in Penticton Nov. 22 at the Lier House at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.

For more information visit www.innerpeacemovement.ca.

 

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