Moger: How to extend and enjoy your golden years

Why we need to achieve and maintain our quality of life fitness level as we grow older.

“Those who think they have not time for bodily exercise will sooner or later have to find time for illness.”

—Edward Stanley



Being overweight was never really much of an issue for me until after having two children. I somehow found myself 50 lbs overweight and struggling to lose it.

I wasn’t health-conscious in my life up to that point, but what I was about to discover set me on a new lifestyle path and ultimately into a career as a fitness professional.

I began to read about nutrition and started to make better food choices and made exercise a priority.

In five months, I lost the 50 pounds leaving me wanting to help motivate and inspire others with my newfound experience.

I decided to take some fitness courses in order to help others achieve the healthy lifestyle I had attained.

After recognizing my passion and call into the fitness industry in 2001, I started my mobile business, Pursuit Fitness and began training and Instructing 50+ and older adults

What started with instructing fitness classes for many seniors in retirement homes has grown into offering many other programs—in home and gym personal training, strengthening and fall prevention classes, warm water pool classes and nutritional coaching.

I’ve also been pleased to offer columns on seniors’ fitness for the Kelowna Capital News over the past four years

I feel privileged and have learned a great deal specializing with older adults including the challenges and limitations many face with disease and joint replacements and the difference in safety and offering exercise modifications.

But most importantly, to talk about why we need to achieve and maintain our quality of life fitness level as we grow older.

The best book that’s impacted me regarding seniors’ health is called Younger Next Year, written by two doctors on the premise of how to live strong and fit until age 80 and beyond.

They say that there is a critical distinction between aging and decaying.

The aging process is inevitable—it’s designed to be a slow process but decay is optional.

As we age, we notice every year we are getting a little fatter, slower, weaker, and more pain-racked.

As we head down the path of our 60s, we may start to feel ourselves venturing down a long, slippery downhill slope into old age and our demise.

But the “get old and die” attitude is such a poor outlook for the third stage of our lives.

With our life expectancy being extended today, we can live well into our 80s, whether in good health or shuffling around with a walker.

The book makes the point that 70 per cent of what you feel as aging is optional.

While biological aging can’t be avoided, most premature death is lifestyle-related and can be forestalled.

Our modern lifestyle of consuming junk food, stress, lack of sleep and insufficient exercise can be altered.

Being sedentary is one of the most important signals for decay. Without daily exercise you are telling your body it’s time to get old.

The keys to overriding the decay code are daily exercise, reasonable nutrition, emotional commitment and a real engagement with living.

I have witnessed the benefits of older adults staying active and love helping to motivate and inspire people to live well.

My goal is to instill in my clients the value of a healthy lifestyle through proper diet and exercise —and to give them the necessary tools to achieve their fitness goals.

Just Posted

World Down Syndrome Day: The up side of Down

A Kelowna family’s journey with Down Syndrome: ‘There is tremendous beauty in these kids’

Kelowna cops crack down on drivers using cell phones

Drivers caught talking or texting behind the wheel now face a fine totalling $543

Okanagan Falls winery showing international photo project

Liquidity Wines will be sole Canadian show of National Geographic’s Photo Ark

West Kelowna mayor meets finance minister to protest speculation tax

Doug Findlater presents Carole James with booklet of info outlining tax’s impact on his city

Kelowna celebrates World Down Syndrome Day

More than 50 people gathered in Kelowna to bring awareness to diversity and difference

Crook’s Corner

Arts and entertainment highlights this week across the Okanagan

B.C. Scientists witness first-ever documented killer whale infanticide

“It’s horrifying and fascinating at the same time.”

Lawyer for one suspect in beating of man with autism says he’s not guilty

Ronjot Singh Dhami will turn himself in, lawyer said

Liberals awarded $100,000 contract to man at centre of Facebook data controversy

Christopher Wylie says his voter-profiling company collected private information from 50 million Facebook users

Facebook’s Zuckerberg admits mistakes in privacy scandal

Zuckerberg admits to privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm, but no apology

Rockets’ Foote a finalist for top WHL D-man

Cal Foote named the Western Conference top defenseman; Foote and Dube named all-stars

UPDATE: Former B.C. city councillor sentenced nine months for sexual assault

Dave Murray, convicted this past fall, hired a private investigator to intrude on the victim’s life.

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Shots fired in Kamloops

Kamloops RCMP are investigating a report of shots fired and a possible explosion at a trailer court

Most Read