Provencher: Turn out the lights on sleep apnea

Do you wake up feeling not quite refreshed and ready to face your day with the energy you’d like to have?

Do you or someone you know snore? Are you restless in your sleep?

Do you wake up feeling not quite refreshed and ready to face your day with the energy you’d like to have?

Do you wake up frequently in the night?

Are you tired or exhausted during your day?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, you may be suffering from a sleep breathing disorder (SBD).

It is estimated by the World Health Organization that as many as 100 million people suffer from sleep apnea worldwide.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the sleep breathing disorder with the most awareness, and is a condition whereby a person stops breathing for a period of time because their airway is literally obstructed.

However, it is not the only SBD. The numbers of people suffering goes up when you include the people that partially stop breathing, those that just require a lot more effort to breathe at night, those who don’t receive a signal from their brains to breathe, and those that develop reduced blood oxygen levels at night.

All of these SBDs have dramatic impact on a person’s body and physiology.

These include lack of oxygen for the brain, fragmented sleep resulting in insufficient deep or reparative sleep, and chronic stress on one’s nervous system.

The result is decreased immune function, increased sense of pain, lack of cognition/memory, and metabolic disorders such as high blood pressure, obesity and type II diabetes.

Science is very clear about the significance of SBD’s and OSA when we look at the stats and the studies.

Untreated OSA can put a person 23 times more at risk for having a heart attack.

Studies have demonstrated that 65 to 85 per cent of stroke victims had OSA.

Further, untreated OSA can shorten a person’s life by up to 20 per cent depending on severity. These are to highlight but a few of the serious issues associated with SBDs.

You might be wondering why a dentist is writing on this topic.

The answer is simple: A person often sees their dentist more than any other health care practitioner, and a dentist with training can recognize the risk factors and bring the topic to a patient’s attention.

Such a dentist could also be able to easily and painlessly test a person’s quality of sleep with the use of portable monitoring equipment.

Then to take it a step further, many of the SBDs are treatable with the use of a custom fit appliance known as a mandibular advancement device.

Sleep breathing disorder is a serious health risk with large ramifications in terms of a person’s quality of life as well as length of life.

To really appreciate that simply think about this statement: The most important thing to any living being is their next breath.

Just Posted

Your Saturday story catch-up

Every Saturday, read our popular stories from the week

Friends of Gable Beach concerned with District of Lake Country’s proposal

Carr’s Landing residents oppose the district’s latest solution to Gable Beach

Greyhound stop in Oyama gets cut

Expanded regional transit replacement option for Lake Country

Heavy snowfall for Coquihalla

Kelowna - Snowfall is expected to continue on the highway until Sunday

Lake Country budget approved

Lake Country’s 2018 Operating and Capital Budget was approved Tuesday night

President praises nearly 1,800 volunteers at B.C. Games

Ashley Wadhwani sits down with the Kamloops 2018 B.C. Winter Games President Niki Remesz

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

The way government learn someone has died is getting a digital overhaul

Governments in Canada turned to private consultants 2 years ago to offer blueprint

Bobsleigh team misses Olympic medal finish

Canadian team finishes four-man event 0.84 seconds behind first place, 0.31 seconds from podium

A most delicious competition at the Mall at Piccadilly

Salmon Arm hosts the Best of the Shuswap Pie Baking Contest

B.C. Games: Athletes talk Team Canada at PyeongChang 2018

From Andi Naudie to Evan McEachran there’s an Olympian for every athlete to look up to

Snowboarders sliding into fresh territory at B.C. Games

Athletes hit the slopes for first appearance as an event at the B.C. Winter Games in Kamloops

Looking back at the 1979 B.C. Games: Good memories, even better jackets

39 years later, Kamloops is hosting the Winter Games again, with some volunteers returning

OLYMPICS 101: Oldest and youngest Canadians to reach the podium

This year, Canada sent its most athletes in Winter Games history, here’s a look at record breakers

Most Read