Xeriscape course helps to revitalize a front yard

In the early spring of 2010, Wayne Goreski attended my introduction to xeriscape class.

In the early spring of 2010, Wayne Goreski attended my introduction to xeriscape class.

He was planning to take out the lawn in his small front yard and xeriscape by laying down landscape fabric, covering it with rocks and adding a few plants.

Within a month of him taking the class, I received before, during and after photos of his project. Along with the pictures, he offered the following comment:

“Gwen: Here are a few pictures of my spring xeriscape project. I am so pleased with how it turned out and have received many compliments. I followed your guidance—no stones except the walkway, no filter cloth, and used drip irrigation. I mixed some native and non-native plants for summer colour—and voila—all done. I have lots of bees and butterflies. It sure makes grass look boring.”

Among the flowers Wayne put in his front yard were Diabolo ninebark, coreopsis, dotted gayfeather, gaillardia , yarrow, echinacea, Russian sage, bachelor button, rudbeckia, daisy, catananche, and chicken and hens.

He also planted mosquito grass (blue gamma), blue oat grass, Elizah blue fescue, fountain grass and feather reed grass.

As well, he recently entered his garden in the Okanagan Xeriscape Association Xeriscape Garden Contest. “I love my garden and wish to share with others how you can have a more beautiful front yard with no grass and much less water usage…grandkids love it,” he said.

Gwen Steele is executive director of the non-profit Okanagan Xeriscape Association.

www.okanaganxeriscape.org

 

 

Kelowna Capital News