Planning some projects for your pad?

Investing in energy-efficiency upgrades could qualify you for rebates and bonuses

Renovating your kitchen or installing new hardwood flooring will definitely make your home look nicer, but if you’re planning on staying in your home long term, a dollar return on the investment is unlikely. But that’s not the case with energy-efficiency upgrades and improvements!

Investing in a new high-efficiency furnace or increasing your attic insulation are major upgrades, but not only will they reduce your home’s energy costs year-after-year, you may also be eligible for rebates through FortisBC’s Home Renovation Rebate Program* and CleanBC Home Efficiency Rebates. And if you make two or more eligible energy-efficiency upgrades within 18 months of each other, you’ll also be eligible for their $300 two-upgrade bonus. That’s on top of your rebates!

Here’s how it works. Let’s say this Christmas you replace your old furnace with a rebate-eligible new high-efficiency ENERGY STAR® model and FortisBC gives you a $1,000 rebate. Then next spring you have your attic insulated and get a $500 rebate from FortisBC. Because you’ve made two eligible upgrades within 18 months of each other, you’re eligible for the $300 two-upgrade bonus. All you have to do is check the bonus check box when you apply for your second rebate. So not only are you getting $1,500 in rebates and ongoing savings on your home’s heating (and possibly cooling with improved insulation) bills for years to come, you’re also getting an extra $300 just doing two upgrades.

Another option is to replace both your space and water-heating systems at the same time with a combination heating and hot water system. Even though it’s one system, it counts as two upgrades so you’d still be eligible for the $300 bonus—and you don’t have to wait until you make your next upgrade to receive the bonus.

FortisBC is committed to helping customers reduce their energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions and improve the comfort of their homes. That’s why they only provide rebates on the most efficient products and equipment and also require them to be installed to quality standards. A furnace may claim it’s 99 per cent efficient, but if it’s not installed properly, it may not work as efficiently as it was designed to. The same goes for insulation. If it’s installed improperly, your home won’t hold in the heat as well, and poorly installed insulation could also create mold and safety hazards.

To support a quality installation, FortisBC requires that furnaces be installed with a two-pipe direct vent system by a licensed gas contractor—you can find one through their Trade Ally Network – and that insulation be installed by a licensed contractor. They even have a list of program-registered insulation contractors you can use.

Now, that’s energy at work.

*Conditions apply. Not all upgrades are eligible for the $300 two-upgrade bonus. Full program terms and conditions are available at fortisbc.com/homerebates. This program may be changed or cancelled at any time.

 

FortisBC is committed to helping customers reduce their energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions and improve the comfort of their homes.

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