Rogers is Committed to Connecting BC Communities

Expanding 5G and building rural connectivity are top priorities for Rogers

Rogers is working to define and advance the possibilities of 5G, so that ultimately these technologies can address economic and social challenges faced by communities across Canada, says Rogers BC President, Rick Sellers.

“We live here, we work here, we give back here.”

That’s the core value behind the national technology company most Canadians are familiar with, according to Rogers BC President, Rick Sellers. With all eyes focused on 5G, Rogers is making meaningful investments tied to social purpose and connecting BC communities.

Rogers has achieved significant milestones since early 2020, starting with Canada’s first and largest 5G network.* Since then, it has expanded to over 700 communities across Canada, more than 250 of which are right here in BC.

Safety-enhancing, efficient solutions such as smart cities, earthquake detection, and drone delivery are made possible by this investment, as they leverage the ultra-fast capacity of the Rogers 5G network.

The Rogers partnership with the University of British Columbia is part of its $20-million investment to explore 5G innovation with leading institutions across the country.

“We’re working with brilliant minds to define and advance the possibilities of 5G, so that ultimately these technologies address economic and social challenges faced by communities across Canada,” Sellers says.

Rogers is partnered with the City of Kelowna to trial smart transportation systems in Kelowna’s downtown core. The pilot targets pedestrian safety improvements and reduced traffic-related accidents by leveraging historical data to generate real-time traffic management solutions.

Rural connectivity: Makes more possible.

Rogers plans to establish a new $1 billion Rogers Rural and Indigenous Connectivity Fund to connect rural, remote and Indigenous communities.

Rogers plans to establish a new $1 billion Rogers Rural and Indigenous Connectivity Fund to connect rural, remote and Indigenous communities.

Rogers places equal priority on addressing the country’s digital divide by connecting Canadians.

In order to connect rural, remote and Indigenous communities, Rogers is proposing to establish a new $1 billion Rogers Rural and Indigenous Connectivity Fund, when the Shaw transaction is complete.

“Connectivity is still a challenge for many rural, remote and Indigenous communities,” Sellers explains. “A wireless connection can be a lifeline in isolated areas; we view this need for connectivity as our responsibility.”

Rogers recently announced a significant investment to increase connectivity along Highway 16 —The Highway of Tears, enabling vital communications and improving safety conditions of more than 250kms between Prince George and Prince Rupert. Given the tragic history of this highway and its impact on Indigenous women, rural remote and vulnerable BC communities, Rogers didn’t stop there. They followed quickly with a wireless program for women’s shelters and a contribution to the Indian Residential School Survivors Society.

“We employ more than 1,700 British Columbians who live and work in communities across BC. Our team is passionate about the work we do, and are dedicated to bettering the life of every Canadian,” Sellers reflects. “Our investments show our commitment to doing what’s right.”

* Largest based on total square kilometres of Rogers 5G coverage compared to published coverage of other national networks

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