Why canning isn’t just for your grandma

Canning benefits include saving money and extending the availability of seasonal foods

Sponsored by Canadian Tire | Impress Branded Content

For many, a childhood staple was visiting grandma’s house and eating canned peaches, cherries, apples, or pickles that were tucked away like hidden gems in the pantry.

But canning isn’t just for your grandma anymore, as more people – young and old — are choosing to preserve their fruits and veggies.

Before you start thinking you “can’t” do it, just by following a few simple steps, you will find that you definitely “can!”

Canadian Tire is making it easier than ever for all ages to take advantage of the pleasure of preserving food, with a section of their site dedicated to providing recipes, canning products (including a starter kit), and a video showcasing canning basics.

Canning involves placing foods in jars and heating them to a temperature that destroys potential bacteria. During this process, a vacuum seal is also formed that keeps the food fresher, longer. Canning allows you to be in control of what goes into your food while buying store-bought or packaged food often takes that choice away.

Other benefits of canning include: extending the availability of seasonal product, saving money by making long-lasting food at home, and as an added bonus, it feels good to share the final product with friends and family.

Years ago, canning was much more time consuming. Today, with proficient refrigerators, farmers markets, and recipes available online, preserving small batches of various foods can be done in a sophisticated, creative, and efficient way.

Canning is a skill any modern food-lover should try, if not to experience the joy of creating something delicious, then at the very least, to make grandma proud.

Visit canadiantire.ca/canning for everything you need to know about canning, including recipes, tips, and product tests by Canadian Tire’s Tested for Life in Canada testers.

Just Posted

Interior Health managers voice discontent

Negative comments about work culture aimed at CEO Chris Mazurkewich.

Students frustrated by UBCO response to harassment allegations

Kelowna - Students were unaware of resources on campus

Video: Bulky bobcat goes for a stroll

Bob Lindley shared a video of a sneaky bobcat strolling through his yard in Vernon.

Cops report explosion in number of thefts from vehicles in Central Okanagan

In just the first 2 1/2 weeks of 2018, the number has nearly tripled in Kelowna and West Kelowna

Kelowna and West Kelowna’s unsolved crimes of the week

RCMP are searching for a fraud suspect and vandal suspect in this week’s unsolved crimes

Kelowna’s Ursel to coach host team at Olympics

Bob Ursel is headed to the Olympics with South Korea’s national men’s curling team

WestJet appeals lost bid to scrap harassment lawsuit

Airline argues judge was wrong to have dismissed the company’s application to strike the legal action

Can U.S. border guards search your phone? Yes, and here’s how

Secretary of homeland security explains a new policy that let’s border guards check phones

‘Beautiful writer’ Nancy Richler dies of cancer in Vancouver hospital

Montreal-born author spent most of her adult life in B.C. as a fiction writer and novelist

B.C. commuters vote to rename bus service to ‘Jeff’

The company asked and the people of Facebook answered

EDITORIAL: With harassment allegations, students deserve better at UBCO

The lack of communication with students isn’t good enough for the Kelowna campus

Physical altercation turns to online threats in Celista

Police were called to a Shuswap ice rink after a group of men physically fought each other

Arson suspect heads to court

Vernon man suspected of starting a string of 2014 fires in Vernon

Opinion: Dare to be smarter

Just say no works for more than just substance abuse

Most Read