Government to compensate torture victims nine years after inquiry findings

Government to compensate torture victims

OTTAWA — The federal government will give apologies and compensation to three Canadians who were tortured in Syria. 

The Canadian Press has independently confirmed a Toronto Star report that the government will settle lawsuits filed by the men over the federal role in their ordeals.

In October 2008, an inquiry led by former Supreme Court justice Frank Iacobucci found Canadian officials contributed to the torture of Abdullah Almalki, Ahmad El Maati and Muayyed Nureddin by sharing information with foreign agencies.

The legal actions pursued by the three men have been grinding slowly through the courts for years.

There was no immediate word about when the settlement would be announced, or about the financial compensation involved.

Maher Arar, another Arab-Canadian who was abused in a Syrian prison, received an apology and $10.5 million from the federal government in 2007.

— Follow @JimBronskill on Twitter

The Canadian Press

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