(Canadian Press)

New York books editor out after backlash over Jian Ghomeshi essay

Ian Buruma, who was appointed as editor of the New York Review of Books in late 2017, no longer works for the publication

An editor at the New York Review of Books has parted ways with the prestigious literary publication amid controversy over his decision to publish a personal essay by disgraced former radio host Jian Ghomeshi.

A publicist for the magazine confirmed Wednesday that Ian Buruma, who was appointed as editor of the New York Review of Books in late 2017, no longer works for the publication.

It’s unclear whether Buruma’s departure is related to the piece, which sparked online backlash from those who argued Ghomeshi shouldn’t have been given such a prestigious platform.

Ghomeshi was acquitted in March 2016 of four counts of sexual assault and one count of choking involving three complainants. In May 2016, he apologized to a fourth complainant and signed a peace bond that saw another count of sexual assault withdrawn.

READ MORE: Ghomeshi reflects on fallout from trial in The New York Review of Books

In the essay, titled “Reflections from a Hashtag” and published online Friday, Ghomeshi details his life post-trial and expresses “deep remorse” for the way he treated some people, but said he cannot confess to accusations he maintains are “inaccurate.”

“I’ve become a hashtag. One of my female friends quips that I should get some kind of public recognition as a #MeToo pioneer,” he writes in the roughly 3,400-word essay.

“There are lots of guys more hated than me now. But I was the guy everyone hated first.”

In an interview with online publication Slate on Friday, Buruma defended his editorial judgment, saying Ghomeshi provided ”an angle on an issue that is clearly very important and that I felt had not been exposed very much.”

Buruma said he was not in a position to know the exact nature of Ghomeshi’s alleged actions, nor was it really his “concern,” given that he was acquitted in court.

“All I know is that he was acquitted and he is now subject to public opprobrium and is a sort of persona non grata in consequence,” he told the Slate interviewer.

“The interest in the article for me is what it feels like in that position and what we should think about.”

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Lake Country boy helps feed families in need

Jaymz, 10 and his mother Lisa Daniel are collecting donations for the

New, protective roof for burnt-out historic Kelowna building

The city spending $29,000 to protect the charred remains of the Fleming House over the winter

Sagmoen back in Vernon court this week

Curtis Wayne Sagmoen will appear on all three Vernon matters this week

West Kelowna council to be presented with new Community Wildfire Protection Plan

The plan will help access more funding for predicted wildfires in the new year

Single-vehicle crash on Highway 97 south of Vernon

Second crash on Highway 97 near Vernon Sunday

Cookies and puppies at the Kelowna BC SPCA

The Kelowna BC SPCA is hosting it’s annual Christmas bake sale on Dec. 15

Break-in at home of detained Chinese Huawei executive

Meng Wanzhou was detained in Vancouver on America’s request

Natural gas rates will go up in B.C. on Jan. 1

Regions could pay up to $68 more

Top House Dems raise prospect of impeachment, jail for Trump

It could be an “impeachable offense” if it’s proven that President Donald Trump directed illegal hush-money payments to women during the 2016 campaign.

Winter rolls into the Okanagan to stay

Environment Canada is calling for two-to-four centimetres of snow from Penticton to Salmon Arm

Macron addresses France amid protests; is it too late?

Paris monuments reopened, cleanup workers cleared debris and shop owners tried to put the city on its feet again Sunday.

CUPE calls off Flair Airlines job action citing job security concerns

The union says it’s going to challenge Flair’s move at the Canada Industrial Relations Board before proceeding with any job action.

Most Read