Ontario warns New York consequences of Buy American would harm state businesses

Ontario warns of consequences to Buy American

WINDSOR, Ont. — Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne says she hopes New York State legislators will vote against Buy American provisions in their budget, and warns that if they don’t, she’ll consider “all options” in response.

One such option would see the provincial government respond in kind and stop buying from New York companies.

Economic Development Minister Brad Duguid says it is in New York’s interest to prevent that from happening because the state’s companies do significant business with the Ontario government.

He adds they wouldn’t want to be prevented from bidding on $160 billion of provincial infrastructure projects coming over the next 12 years.

But Wynne says she hope it won’t come to that — she’d prefer to see Ontario exempt from the Buy American policy, which is expected to come to a vote as early as Friday.

Wynne and Duguid made their comments Thursday in Windsor.

Wynne’s government has been actively lobbying state politicians against protectionist policies and stepped up those efforts since the election of President Donald Trump. Ontario’s message has been that free and open trade between Ontario and neighbouring U.S. states benefits both sides of the border, and protectionism will hurt both sides.

“While we’re encouraged by the response that the ministers received in Albany and we’re hopeful that New York State will make the right decision, we are considering all reasonable options to protect Ontario jobs in the face of Buy American policies,” Wynne said.

Governor Andrew Cuomo’s New York Buy American Act would require all state entities to buy from American companies for all procurements greater than US$100,000.

That would “seriously undermine” its relationship with Ontario, Wynne warned.

If Cuomo’s proposal succeeds, Wynne said her government would seek a bilateral deal exempting Ontario.

“Should that not occur, then I think what the Premier is saying is make no mistake about it, we’ll do what we need to do to stand up for the businesses and workers in Ontario,” said Duguid.

“This premier is building transit, and roads, and bridges, infrastructure like no one has in the history of this province,” he continued.

“A company like Alstom in New York has engaged in very important contracts for our transit system builds. We’ve got $160 billion in investment coming in the next 12 years and I expect New York companies are going to want to have access to that as well.”

 

Jessica Smith Cross, The Canadian Press

Just Posted

Indigenous festival co-creator looking to build traditonal Okanagan event

The inaugural Okanagan Indigenous Music and Arts Festival is July 6 and 7

Police seek two suspects and car after stabbing in Kelowna

The stabbing took place on Friday evening on Wilson Avenue. It sent one man to hospital.

Caged: Kelowna Falcons suffer 6th straight loss

The Falcons look for revenge Saturday night after a 15-5 loss

Okanagan-Shuswap Weather: Heat, sun and a chance of thunderstorms for Father’s Day

Morning pancake breakfasts and fishing derbies across the region will see sun, showers may follow.

Pirko found guilty in the 2014 second-degree murder of Chris Ausman

A Kelowna jury found Steven Randy Pirko guilty of the second-degree murder

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

South Okanagan pharmacy restricted from dispensing opioid treatment drugs

B.C. College of Pharmacists alleges Sunrise Pharmacy dispensed treatment drugs against rules

Okanagan pitcher tosses second no-hitter of season

Vernon’s Jarod Leroux has two no-nos in his last three starts for the BCPBL’s Okanagan Athletics

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Summerland ready for dry summer conditions

Province has declared Level Two drought, but Summerland has not increased watering restrictions

Summerland pioneers had connection to Middlesex, England

Harry Dunsdon and Richard Turner became cattlemen

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Give Hope Wings fundraiser launches Saturday from Pitt Meadows

Flying marathon will benefit low income Canadians needing flights for medical treatment

Most Read