Allie Lake wildfire still out of control at 2,200 hectares

112 firefighting personnel and 10 helicopters are tackling the flames

The Allie Lake wildfire is currently estimated to be at 2200 hectares and still out of control.

“The Allie Lake fire did not grow overnight. We had some quite cool temperatures, so that was some good news,” said fire information officer Heather Rice.

“We do have 112 firefighting personnel on the fire, including initial attack crews and they are being supported by 10 helicopters and eight pieces of heavy equipment.”

A 12-member incident command team has also been assigned.

“Currently, the resources we have we think are efficient at this point in time as long as the weather doesn’t change for us,” said Rice.

“As you know for all fires, it’s mainly up to that wind. If we get an unexpected wind gust, it can take the fire off, but the crews are feeling pretty confident on how things are looking.”

No further personnel will be sent for now, as crews are making headway with fireguards.

Evacuation orders remain in place for 14 properties.

“There was no lightning at the time, so I think it can be assumed it was human-caused, but it is still under investigation,” Rice said.

An area restriction for Crown land surrounding the fire is now in place until Oct. 31 or when the order is rescinded. The public is restrict from that area so that crews can do their work.

* North boundary: Commencing north of Young Lake and west of Spectacle Lake 51° 17.382’ x 120° 56.418 heading east toward the north side of Bonaparte Lake, connecting to 51° 17.508’ x -120° 33.816’.

* East boundary: Continue from North boundary 51° 17.508’ x -120° 33.816’ heading south across Bonaparte Lake, along the eastern edge of Elbow Lake and Heller Lake toward Hiahkwah Lake, Home Cabin Lake Road to 51° 6.432’ x 120° 33.534.

* South boundary: Continue from 51° 6.432’ x 120° 33.534 Hiahkwah Lake, Home Cabin Lake Road heading west toward Fatox Lake and Skookum Lake toward Brigade Creek at 51° 6.366 x 120° 56.04.

* West boundary: Continue from at 51° 6.366 x 120° 56.04 by Brigade Creek heading north across Hamilton Creek and then west toward the north side of Young Lake at 51° 17.382’ x 120° 56.418.

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