Animal in distress complaints on the rise

Kelowna residents are being hyper vigilant when it comes to notifying police about anything they see trapped in a hot car.

Kelowna RCMP Cpl. Brenda Daly (right) helps a dog owner from Hinton

Kelowna RCMP Cpl. Brenda Daly (right) helps a dog owner from Hinton

Kelowna residents are being hyper vigilant when it comes to notifying police about anything they see trapped in a hot car.

And according to one Mountie who was called to a “dog in distress” report Wednesday morning, it’s always the right thing to do—even if the creature trapped isn’t quite distressed.

“Obviously we care about safety first,” said Corp. Kris Clark, during an overcast portion of  Wednesday morning.

“Today, already, we’ve had two or three calls. Since the dog perished, and the child was stuck in the hot car, people have been calling in more.”

In this case, police officers went to all the nearby stores to find the owners of the truck, which had housed a blue healer puppy that was panting up a storm.

The search lasted 10 minutes until they found the owners of the truck, a couple visiting here from Hinton, Alta.

They were more than surprised to see the gathering of police and media as they headed to their truck. When they opened a door to the truck cab, the puppy trundled out, greeted the small crowd that gathered and rolled on its back for a tummy-rub.

“Upon getting out of the truck, the dog seemed to be fine,” said Clark. “It isn’t a hot day, but if it was left longer it could have been in serious distress.”

Clark pointed out that the family in the shop were on their way out the door when the police came to get them, but it’s always a better policy to leave your dog at home if you have to do some shopping.

If they had, there would have been no need for two police officers and a regional district bylaw official to attend the scene.

 

kmichaels@kelownacapnews.com

 

 

Kelowna Capital News