Greg Smith poses with his sons Alex (left) and Carter. The Smiths are launching a new peer-to-peer trunk-sharing system in B.C. and beyond. (Greg Smith Photo)

Greg Smith poses with his sons Alex (left) and Carter. The Smiths are launching a new peer-to-peer trunk-sharing system in B.C. and beyond. (Greg Smith Photo)

B.C. father and sons launch new trunk-sharing system, ‘Trunkit’

Smiths say peer-to-peer shipping service offers an affordable, green alternative

A father-sons trio is hoping their new trunk-sharing service will become the Airbnb of shipping.

Greg Smith and his teenage sons Carter and Alex of Pitt Meadows are calling people to sign up for Trunkit, their new peer-to-peer shipping service.

“People in Prince George and (Penticton) just can’t get stuff around,” Smith told the Western News. “We’re just trying to let everybody know that, ‘Hey, your delivery needs are solved.’

“Those that need to get stuff places and those that are driving all over the place paying $1.30 for fuel, well, we’re going to offset that for you very soon.”

Related: New courier company rises out of Greyhound shutdown

In a nutshell, Trunkit is a new website where drivers can post trips they’re planning to take with an empty trunk. Other users who have something to ship can agree on a price with the driver, pay, and use a chat service to sort out the pickup and delivery details.

“There’ll be user reviews just like Airbnb” so people know who they are dealing with, said Smith, who is a police officer in New Westminster.

Other optional levels of verification will include profiles with names, photos and driver’s licenses.

When it comes to what to charge, Trunkit will calculate a suggested price based on the size of the item and vehicle, cost of gas, and number of kilometres. (However, Smith said, drivers can try to charge whatever they want.)

Smith said Trunkit will also facilitate payments.

“We hold the money until the trip is delivered and then we pay,” said Smith. “So there’s some security with that.”

For facilitating these things, Smith said Trunkit takes 15 per cent of the agreed-upon price of the trip and the driver gets the rest.

He said the idea came when his family was trying to move a couch from Vancouver to Vernon a couple years ago.

“The couch wasn’t worth much, so we needed to try and find a way to get it up there and we couldn’t,” Smith said. “You’re not going to go Purolator or anything else way over the value of the actual couch.”

Weeks later Smith and sons drove the couch up to Vernon themselves and couldn’t help but notice all of the empty trunks along way.

“We thought, ‘There’s got to be a way to find out who is going this way,’” Smith said. “So, the idea was born.”

They approached Vancouver-based web designer Evilnut and after about a year of development, the site is now ready to go.

Related: Greyhound officially ends service in B.C.

The site has registered about 100 people so far, after publishing posts in Facebook groups for communities such as Osoyoos, Oliver and Penticton.

However, this week Trunkit will be uploading an instructional video to its website and has a contract with Daily Hive to start releasing video advertisements on a wider scale.

Since Trunkit is still working on insurance options, Smith recommended that early adopters start by using the service for smaller items.

“We’re getting an insurance rider that’s developed specifically for Trunkit,” he said. “But we’re still in the works with that.

“Right now Trunkit would be more for the couch that’s not worth a lot of money or a bag of clothes, a box of gifts.”

Along with adding insurance options, Smith said they have plans to expand across Canada and down into the U.S., and to develop an app if the service takes off.

He said his sons are “very excited to see Trunkit work.”

Sons Carter (16) and Alex (14) have accompanied Smith to virtually every meeting, from business lunches with website developers to contract negotiations with advertising executives.

“Part of this for me is for them to understand how to talk to adults and go to meetings and interact rather than just through texting and stuff like that, but to actually go and have a productive meeting and learn about the world of business,” Smith said.

“It was them and I that came up with this, so we do it as a team. We’re all the founders, all three of us,” he added. “Everything that I do, they do with me.”



karissa.gall@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.

Just Posted

The RCMP presence in Central Okanagan public schools is being reviewed by the board of education. (File photo)
RCMP presence welcomed in Central Okanagan public schools

Staff survey feedback overwhelmingly positive from students, staff and parents

The administrative headquarters for the Central Okanagan Public Schools. (File photo)
COVID-19 exposures confirmed at 2 Central Okanagan Schools

The infected individuals are self-isolating at home

Farming Karma is set to release a line of fruit vodka sodas soon. (Twila Amato/Black Press Media)
Kelowna fruit growers expanding line of beverages

Farming Karma is expanding from fruit sodas to fruit vodka sodas

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

Jane Linden
KCR: Volunteering keeps you active

Kelowna Community Resources shares stories of its volunteers in a weekly column

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

(Heather Lueck image)
Crash north of Enderby closes Highway 97A both ways

A witness shared images of a medical helicopter landing at the scene

18-year-old skier Logan Leach follows his guide, Julien Petit, down an alpine track. The Lumby athlete who is visually impaired has been named to Alpine Canada’s Ski Team ahead of the 2022 Paralympic Games in Beijing. (Contributed)
North Okanagan teen named to national Para-Alpine ski team

18-year-old Logan Leach officially joins Canada’s Para-Alpine roster ahead of Beijing 2022

Most Read