Boeing replaces executive who oversaw 737 Max, other planes

Kevin McAllister is being replaced by Stanley Deal, leader of Boeing’s services division

Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Kevin McAllister is shown here at a delivery ceremony for a Boeing 747-8 freighter to Qatar Airways on Sept. 25, 2017, at Boeing’s delivery center in Everett. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Boeing is replacing the head of its commercial-airplanes division as it struggles with a crisis created by two deadly crashes of its newest airliner.

Boeing said Tuesday that Kevin McAllister is out as chief executive of Boeing Commercial Airplanes. He is being replaced by Stanley Deal, leader of Boeing’s services division.

The shake-up in Boeing’s top ranks comes just days after the release of internal communications that showed a senior test pilot experienced serious problems while testing flight-control software for the 737 Max on a simulator.

That software, called MCAS, is at the centre of investigations into two crashes that killed 346 people and led to grounding of the Max. Boeing is taking much longer than executives expected to change the software and get the plane flying again.

Boeing announced two other promotions, including a replacement for Deal, who has led Boeing Global Services since the division was created in 2016.

McAllister was recruited from General Electric Co.’s jet-engine operation to run Boeing’s biggest division in 2016, just months before the 737 Max went into service. Boeing did not specify whether he quit or was fired.

READ MORE: Boeing, FAA both faulted in certification of the 737 Max

“The Boeing board fully supports these leadership moves,” Chairman David Calhoun said in a prepared statement.

Calhoun himself is new in his position. CEO Dennis Muilenburg also served as company chairman until the board stripped him of that job and elevated Calhoun two weeks ago.

In a statement, Muilenburg thanked McAllister for his service “during a challenging time, and for his commitment to support this transition.”

Boeing took a $5.6 billion pretax charge this summer to cover its estimate for compensating airlines that have cancelled thousands of flights because of grounded planes. It has disclosed nearly $3 billion in other additional costs related to the grounding.

The company faces dozens of lawsuits by families of passengers killed in the Max crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia. It is also the subject of investigations by the Justice Department and Congress.

Chicago-based Boeing Co. is scheduled to report its latest financial results on Wednesday.

David Koenig, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Kelowna homeless to demand improvements to their living conditions

Homeless residents of Kelowna’s tent city on Leon Avenue are calling a press conference on Nov. 12

Monster Truck Chaos gear up for Kelowna invasion

The monster truck event comes to Prospera Place for two shows in January

Review: City and Colour brings patented sound to Kelowna

City and Colour are touring their latest album ‘A Pill for Loneliness’ across Canada throughout November

West Kelowna Warriors find new owner

The BC Hockey League approved the sale of the Warriors to John Murphy and Rod Hume

Veterans honoured at Lake Country Remembrance Day ceremony

Remembrance day event in Lake Country was one of five ceremonies that took place across Central Okanagan

Kelowna-based inventor talks about his new apple variety

The Cosmic Crisp is designed to be sturdy, crisp, sweet and tart

Penticton on Bamford’s list of stops in 2020

Gord Bamford and friends are scheduled to stop in Penticton in 2020

Brian Burke considered favourite to replace Don Cherry

Brian Burke is the 5-4 pick to be the full-time replacement next season

Major donor Peter Allard takes UBC to court to get his name on all law degrees

Philanthropist claims school not adhering to 2014 agreement for his $30-million donation

Report predicts drug resistance likely to kill 400,000 Canadians by 2050

This increase is expected to cost Canada 396,000 lives, $120 billion in hospital expenses

Morning Start: Was Sean Connery’s James Bond hair too good to be true?

Your morning start for Tuesday, November 12th, 2019

Environment Canada forecasts 10-15 cm of snow for Shuswap

Snow is expected to be replaced with rain in the afternoon

Photos: Lest We Forget

Today, Penticton remembers those who fought for our country and way of life.

Most Read