Business waste busted

If you operate a business and are throwing recyclables in the garbage, it’s time to make some changes to the way you dispose of your waste.

  • Jan. 28, 2011 1:00 p.m.

If you operate a business and are throwing recyclables in the garbage, it’s time to make some changes to the way you dispose of your waste.

Kelowna and the regional districts’ waste reduction office are launching a program that targets mandatory recyclables in commercial trash, and those that don’t comply will be hit with surcharges.

The program is in response to the results of a comprehensive waste composition study conducted at the Glenmore landfill in 2010.

It showed approximately half the garbage originating from local businesses and multi- family developments could have been diverted into an existing recycling program.

Banned material will result in a $150 per metric tonne surcharge levied against the waste hauler, over and above any other required tipping fees.

The surcharges will ultimately be passed along to the business owner.

“As it stands now, huge amounts of materials which are easily divertible are still filling up our landfill, materials such as plastic film, metal, cardboard, and paper products,” said waste reduction manager Peter Rotheisler.

“There is no reason for these items to be thrown in the garbage when a variety of other disposal options are available.”

Rotheisler added theprogram is about educating businesses about the various recycling options available to them and the social, economic and environmental benefits of managing waste responsibly.

“We’re focusing on all commercial sectors, including institutional, industrial, construction and demolition, as well as apartment and condo complexes,” he said.

“Our message is be informed, know your waste, make a plan.”

The list of banned materials targeted and banned from burial at the landfill includes: plastic film, cardboard, paper products, plastic containers, yard waste, asphalt and concrete, white goods (large metal appliances), drywall, beverage containers, hazardous waste, tires, batteries, cell phones and electronic equipment

(In addition, small appliances will be banned as of April of this year, and clean wood will be banned in the future.)

Local waste haulers have been telling their customers about surcharges to be applied to loads containing banned items and are in the process of helping their customers make the required changes to the way they manage their waste.

The regional waste reduction office is also spearheading a comprehensive education campaign about the program and will be assisting local businesses improve their waste practices.

For more information about the commercial diversion program targeting mandatory recyclables, visit regionaldistrict.com/recycle or call 250-469-6250.

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