Carbon monoxide a stealthy foe, public urged to take precautions

Heavy snow and power outages underline need to check monitors, ensure proper venting

It’s a stealthy killer, but one that, if recognized, can easily be stopped.

Autumn and winter are when an increase in potentially lethal carbon monoxide poisoning takes place. As an odourless, colourless and tasteless gas, it’s not easily detected.

Laura McLeod, a spokesperson for Technical Safety BC, points to an instance on Vancouver Island in November when an adult and a child were taken to hospital, with the likely cause being a malfunctioning gas fireplace.

Last winter, three children and five adults in the Fraser Valley were treated for carbon monoxide exposure, which was caused by a vent connector that had dislodged from a chimney.

Last year in Winnipeg, she said, people in a motel developed carbon monoxide poisoning possibly due to a faulty boiler.

Technical Safety BC recommends buying Canadian-certified carbon monoxide alarms and never ignoring the device’s warning sound. Portable, battery-operated models are available if the power goes out, which McLeod recommends also using in Airbnbs, motels, hotels and even longer-term rentals.

If your home alarm is more than seven years old it should be replaced and, if it doesn’t have a date on it, it’s very likely ready for retirement.

Read more: Carbon monoxide alarms at Salmon Arm RBC prompt evacuations

Read more: 46 people in hospital after suspected carbon monoxide leak at Winnipeg hotel

For gas-fueled appliances, lack of maintenance is often one of the causes of carbon monoxide problems. Technical Safety BC recommends an annual appliance inspection.

“Gas is a technology where people need to use a licensed contractor registered with Technical Safety BC. It can’t be done by any handyperson,” said McLeod, adding that wood stoves can also create carbon monoxide.

McLeod has heard about the recent evacuations on two consecutive days at a Salmon Arm bank when the carbon monoxide detectors went off, but she hasn’t received a follow-up yet. The Salmon Arm Fire Department reported after the two evacuations that no cause had been determined.

One danger when there are power outages is that people will be tempted to bring in portable propane stoves or barbecues to cook or generate heat, or use portable generators. All produce carbon monoxide.

“It’s very important that those items not be used indoors,” McLeod said.

Regarding furnaces, Steve Genn with Proair Heating & Cooling said they are built with the knowledge there will be power outages, so nothing hazardous happens to them when the power goes out.

Another issue for homes can be snow, or even leaves, which can block appliance vents, keeping the dangerous gas inside.

Although McLeod does not have statistics of carbon-monoxide poisoning in B.C. in 2019 yet, she provided statistics compiled by the BC Coroners Service. Between 2008 and 2017, 119 carbon monoxide-related poisoning deaths were reported in the province.



marthawickett@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Technical Safety BC recommends an annual inspection of appliances and vents. (File photo)

Just Posted

Big White celebrates Aussie Day with a series of fundraisers for wildfire relief

Big White Ski Resort’s restaurants Globe Tapas and Blarney Stone raised $6,000 for charity

Don’t look now: Warriors grab 6th win in 8 games after Morgan’s stellar outing

West Kelowna goalie Riley Morgan made 30 saves in a 4-1 win over Vernon Saturday

Okanagan Symphony maestro joins KSS Music Showcase

OSO music direcor Rosemary Thomsom will MC the upcoming display of Okanagan music talent

Inaugural Barrels & Berms SBX World Cup continues at Big White

The snowboard cross event brings in Canadian and national stars

Rockets get healthy, snap streak with 3-2 win over T-Birds

Kelowna looks for more wins Saturday with the first of back-to-back games with Giants

Officials reaching out to those in contact with Canada’s first coronavirus patient

The illness has sickened at least 1,975 people and killed 56 in China

Investigation launched after six dead puppies dumped in Richmond hotel parking lot

RAPS reminds people they can always give up puppies they can’t take care of

Canadian Lunar New Year celebrations dampened by coronavirus worries

But Health Minister Patty Hajdu said today that the risk of infection is low

B.C. VIEWS: New coronavirus outbreak an important reminder

Walking the line between cautious and alarmist

Snow angels: B.C. volunteers shovel for those who can’t

‘They’ve helped me make it through the rest of the winter’

Kobe Bryant, daughter killed in California helicopter crash

NBA star was reportedly in his private helicopter at the time of the crash

Summerland Steam earn one win, one loss in hockey action

Junior B team in third place in division

It’s okay not to have kids, confesses mother of four

For someone who has committed parenting an obscene number of times, it… Continue reading

Most Read