Each day, the plant located off Gellatly Road in West Kelowna treats an average of 10 million litres of wastewater. —Image: CORD

Central Okanagan residents reminded to be careful about what they put down the drain

Regional district produces video series about impact on Okanagan Lake

What you put down the drain or flush down the toilet can affect the quality water of Okanagan Lake says the Regional District of the Central Okanagan.

That’s why the regional district has produced a series of short videos explaining what residents can do at home to protect the treated effluent released from the Westside Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant.

RDCO communications officer Bruce Smith says what the videos target is known as “source control.”

“Thanks to a water conservation and quality improvement program grant from the Okanagan Basin Water Board and Okanagan Waterwise, we’ve developed four videos showing what people can do at home, or at the source, to protect our lakes,” said Smith.

The videos focus on source control, materials that cannot be flushed down the toilet, fats, oils and greases and leftover medications and pharmaceuticals.

“Our goal is to get people thinking before they let something flow down the drain or flush, so that they’re not reducing water quality or contributing to clogged drains and pipes,” said Smith. “As the videos say, clean water begins at home.”

Earlier this year, the regional district sent an information card to residents serviced by the Westside regional wastewater treatment plant encouraging them to “don’t rush, think before you flush.”

Each day, the plant located off Gellatly Road in West Kelowna treats an average of 10 million litres of wastewater. Practicing source control at home not only helps protect the integrity of the plant’s biological treatment process, it prevents costly clogs and backups of pipes, said Smith.

More importantly, he added, it keeps materials that can’t be removed through the treatment process from entering Okanagan Lake, a source of drinking water for many area residents.

• Food waste like fats, grease and oils (deep fryer oil, vegetable oil, cooking oil) can easily congeal and block pipes.

• Diapers, wet wipes, bandages, personal hygiene products and cotton swabs should be placed into the household garbage.

• Hazardous waste materials like paints, solvents and other chemicals should be disposed of at the free household hazardous waste drop-off location at the Battery Doctor in Kelowna.

• Unused or expired medications and prescription drugs should be returned to a pharmacy and residents can visit www.medicationsreturn.ca for more information.

“Collected kitchen cooking oils, fats, grease and lards can be placed into a container and put into the trash, or taken for disposal in receptacles at the Westside Regional Waste Disposal and Recycling Centre in West Kelowna or the Glenmore landfill (in Kelowna), in order to be recycled in a program with McLeod’s Byproducts of Armstrong,” Smith said.

Links to the videos and more information is available at regionaldistrict.com/wastewater.

Just Posted

Heat taken down by Thunderbirds

The women’s volleyball team fell to the Thunderbirds Saturday night

MacEwan uses strong second quarter to topple Heat

MacEwan Griffins seal fifth win of the season

Kootnekoff: Federal Employment law changes

Federal Bill C-86 received royal assent on Dec. 13, 2018. The Bill… Continue reading

Heat get hot start Saturday night

The Heat defeated the MacEwan Griffins

Day one of Hometown Hockey in West Kelowna

Special guests, music, games, and free pizza! Hometown Hockey countinues on Sunday.

Find me my furever home: Mittens and Boots

Meet Mittens and Boots who are available for adoption at the Kelowna BC SPCA

Olympic softball qualifier to be held in B.C.

Announcement made Saturday evening from Europe

B.C. resident creates global sport training program

The 20 hour course teaches the science and application of interval training at the university level

B.C. VIEWS: Fact-checking the NDP’s speculation tax on empty homes

Negative-option billing is still legal for governments

May plans next move in Brexit fight as chances rise of delay

Some say a lack of action could trigger a ‘public tsunami’

Group challenges ruling for doctors to give referrals for services that clash with beliefs

A group of five Canadian doctors and three professional organizations is appealing

Major winter storm wreaks havoc on U.S. travel

Nearly 5,000 flights were cancelled Sunday around the country

CONSUMER REPORT: What to buy each month in 2019 to save money

Resolve to buy all of the things you want and need, but pay less money for them

Want to avoid the speculation tax on your vacant home? Rent it out, Horgan says

Premier John Horgan and Sheila Malcolmson say speculation and vacancy tax addresses homelessness

Most Read