Boucherie Road at Ogden Road, part of the stretch to be improved as part of the planned Wine Trail work in West Kelowna.—Image credit: Google Maps

Boucherie Road at Ogden Road, part of the stretch to be improved as part of the planned Wine Trail work in West Kelowna.—Image credit: Google Maps

Boucherie Road work moves ahead in West Kelowna

The city awards a $7.3 million construction contract to Copcan Civil Ltd.

The City of West Kelowna has awarded a $7.3 million contract for the second phase of upgrades to a stretch of Boucherie Road known as the West Kelowna Wine Trail.

The contract, awarded to Copcan Civil Ltd., will see the road work done between Stuart Road and Ogden Road and include traffic roundabouts at the intersections with Anders Road and at Hudson Road.

Council agreed to proceed with the second phase of the Boucherie Road upgrade last year but waited to award the contract until it had more information.

Copcan’s bid beat out two others, one for $9.7 million and another for $10.3 million.

Mayor Doug Findlater said Boucherie Road is the most used road in the city after Highway 97.

The total cost of the second phase of work on Boucherie will be $8,755,000, and includes the contract price plus another $962,432 for land acquisition, utility and geotechnical work and a $458,000 contingency.

In addition to the above-ground road work, the project will include replacing aging water infrastructure under the road surface along the route, infrastructure that services homes and several wineries along the route.

While the construction will include sidewalks and bike lanes, it will not feature the controversial median in the middle of the road that was included in the first phase of the Boucherie Road upgrade, between Highway 97 and Stuart Road, a few years ago.

Council was vehemently opposed to including a median when it approved design work last year, saying it has proved to be a problem on many levels between the highway and Stuart Road.

This second phase of the road work will be funded through the city’s capital reserves and Development Cost Charges collected from developers.

Council was told earlier this week, 62 per cent of the work will be funded by DCCs.

The city has also applied for more than $437,000 in grants for the project.

A report on the project presented to council earlier this week said the city has $400,000 from a Transit Gas Tax Fund that was to be used for a future transit-related project that could be used for the road work.

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