The proposed residential tower for 414 Cedar Avenue in the South Pandosy area of Kelowna. —Image: contributed

The proposed residential tower for 414 Cedar Avenue in the South Pandosy area of Kelowna. —Image: contributed

Councillors don’t like it but send tower proposal to public hearing anyway

Despite speaking out against Cedar Avenue project councillors say minds are still open

A number of Kelowna city councillors don’t like it, but none the less have forwarded a proposal to build a 15-storey residential tower in the South Pandosy neighbourhood to a public hearing.

Saying they would approach the public hearing with open minds, the councillors openly expressed concern about the planned height of the building, slated for 414 Cedar Avenue, just west of Pandosy Street. The developer is requesting a variance from the currently allowable seven-storey maximum height.

“I have huge concerns,” said Coun. Luke Stack. “This is not consistent at all (with the city’s plan for what the South Pandosy neighbourhood would be like).”

Couns. Gail Given and Charlie Hodge echoed Stack’s remarks, with Given saying the 14-storey Sopa Square towers in the area were supposed to be the only towers in the area and serve as a focal point, but are now being used as an example for other developments to follow.

Hodge, who predicted a “raucous” public hearing on the development proposal, said the neighbourhood has been vocal in the past about the development of nearby Cedar Park and will not be happy.

Coun. Tracy Gray said she also had concerns and was “reluctantly” voting to send the proposal to a public hearing.

The 34-unit building has the support of city planning staff.

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