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CRTC to bring in ‘code of conduct’ for internet providers

New code will protect customers against high bills, allow for cancellations

Canada’s internet providers will soon have to abide by a code of conduct brought in by the country’s telecommunication regulator.

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) announced Wednesday that the new code will protect users against unexpectedly high bills and help negotiate with internet providers.

The code, which comes into effect Jan. 31, 2020, will enforce easy to understand contracts and policies around service calls, outages, security deposits and disconnections.

It will force internet providers to give clearer information about prices, including limited time and promotion discounts.

The new rules will bring in mandatory “bill shock protection” and notify customers when they reach their data limits and allow users to cancel contracts within 45 days of purchasing with no fees.

READ MORE: CRTC report finds ‘misleading, aggressive’ sales tactics used by telecom industry

READ MORE: Mistakes on mobile, internet and TV bills is No. 1 issue on tally by ombudsman


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