Ken Falk of Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry in Yarrow shows one of his company’s ducks alongside an imported duck from Hungary. Falk and other duck processors say the Canada Food Inspection Agency is allowing inferior product with questionable origins into Canada. (Paul Henderson/ The Progress)

Feds not enforcing standards on Hungarian duck imports, B.C. farmer says

‘You have no way of knowing what’s in the bag’

A Chilliwack poultry farmer is among producers across Canada upset about cheap Hungarian ducks they say are being dumped on the domestic market with inadequate oversight by the Canada Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

Ken Falk of Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry in Yarrow says the CFIA is not addressing the problem, which is leaving consumers to unwittingly purchasing meat with unknown origins and processing, all while leaving Canadian producers to lose market share.

“We are just so frustrated,” Falk told The Progress.

• RELATED: Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry will be looking for leads at upcoming Career Fair

Packaging on a duck from Hungary (left) and from Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry in Yarrow. Feathers are visible in the Hungarian duck, and the label advises that the “product should be heated thoroughly before consumption.” (Paul Henderson/ The Progress)

Speaking with him at his Yarrow operation, Falk shows a frozen Hungarian duck purchased at a Lower Mainland store. There are feathers visible, something no Canadian producer would allow. When defrosted, Falk said the Hungarian ducks have lungs and glands intact, also not permitted in Canada.

And the labelling has an almost comical description of how to cook the bird: “Product should be heated thoroughly before consumption.”

“Hungary seems to be not too worried about quality,” Falk said. “You have no way of knowing what’s in the bag.”

Canadian duck producers are also raising the alarm about other issues: what veterinary medicines are used in Hungary; possible animal abuse; and labour standards where employees earn as little as $3 an hour.

“We are not worried about fair competition,” Falk insists. “But you are allowing this garbage product to come in to Canada.”

The “you” in that statement that is so frustrating Falk is the CFIA who he insists is not protecting consumers and not enforcing food safety laws.

Asked about the issue, a CFIA spokesperson said that since January 2019, importers must hold a “Safe Food for Canadians” licence and ensure imports meet Canadian requirements.

In response, Falk said that is a complaints based system so there is no real prevention, only reaction.

The problem for Canadian duck farmers is that this has been going on for several years, and Falk says only in 2016 when they “screamed” at the government did anything happen.

“In 2017, CFIA conducted an inspection of Hungarian duck meat establishments and found that the inspection system and veterinary drug residue verifications in Hungary were equivalent to the Canadian system,” the CFIA told The Progress.

“Interesting that they are using the word ‘inspection’ here,” Falk responded. “The word they used to us was ‘visit’, saying that they cannot inspect foreign facilities.”

On the quality of the imported ducks, the CFIA when problems are found, Hungarian authorities are notified.

“CFIA’s data and verifications shows that duck meat from Hungary has a high level of compliance, with a few deviations which CFIA has signalled to the Hungarian authorities and requested corrective actions.”

Again, Falk questions the choice of word such as “deviations” and “minor corrective actions” as being insufficient to deal with the potential problems.

When asked to comment, the CFIA said nothing about feathers, labelling, employment standards, or animal welfare.

For years the Quebec Association of Duck and Goose Breeders (AECOQ) has criticized the rules applied in Hungary and the difference for those breeding and processing in Canada.

“The number of products that do not meet Canadian standards can be found in alarming quantities in Canadian markets,” according to an AECOQ press release.

“No Canadian product with this amount of defect could have reached the grocery store shelves.”

As for Falk, he is frustrated as a business owner being undercut by mystery meat being allowed into Canada, and he implores Canadians to shop locally where standards are strict.

“Canada is just accepting the European Union’s word for it but if nobody is watching what is going on, what can we expect to find in Canada?”

Falk said that buying local food as much as possible is a good response to the Hungarian duck issue. The B.C. government declared Dec. 2 to 8 as BC Buy Local Week.

• RELATED: Good things cooking at Barn Burner BBQ event this Sunday in Yarrow

• RELATED: Buy BC: Eat Drink Local campaign returns in May


@PeeJayAitch
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Packaging on a duck from Hungary (left) and from Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry in Yarrow. Feathers are visible in the Hungarian duck, and the label advises that the “product should be heated thoroughly before consumption.” (Paul Henderson/ The Progress)

Just Posted

Gary Vaynerchuk announced as keynote speaker for Level Up 2020

Level Up 2020 is scheduled for Oct. 23 at the Innovation Center in Kelowna

UBC Okanagan to host 2020 softball national championships

The Heat will host the Canadian Collegiate Softball Association National Championships in October

Speedboat reportedly sinking near Manhattan Point in Kelowna

This is the third report of a boat found in the lake in the past two weeks

Kelowna General Hospital takes steps to prevent spread of coronavirus

So far, at least six people have died and 275 people have contracted the virus worldwide

Plans submitted for third hotel across from Kelowna International Airport

YLW passengers in need of accommodations could be getting another option

B.C.-based firefighting plane crashes in Australia, killing three

Three people are confirmed dead in the crash in New South Wales

Canada prepares as WHO decides whether to declare global coronavirus emergency

The city of Wuhan, China, has shut down outbound flights and trains

Survey finds support among Canadians for broader assisted-dying law

The survey was conducted Jan. 17 to 21 among 1,552 Canadians eligible to vote

Doctors dispute need for Salmon Arm urgent and primary care centre

Medical professionals would rather see investment in local Primary Care Network

Veteran B.C. journalist battles cancer through pioneering immunotherapy treatment

Vancouver Island rallies around JR Rardon and family during stay in Seattle

New nasal spray launched in Canada to combat hypoglycemic shock in diabetics

Baqsimi is a nasal spray contains three milligrams of glucagon

Prices for recreational marijuana in B.C. down from a year ago

New inflation figures show gasoline, housing and certain kinds of food cost more

B.C. RCMP spent roughly $750K on massive manhunt for Port Alberni men

Manitoba RCMP helped with 17-day search through the province’s northern terrain

Most Read