Free tire collection and recycling program

Initiative launched by regional district and mosquito control program contractor BWP Consulting in Kelowna and Lake Country.

  • Oct. 4, 2014 8:00 a.m.

They’re stacked outside by the shed.  Or perhaps they’re filled with water outside the carport or garage.   Old, unused tires sitting around your property can be the source of some prime mosquito breeding habitat.

This fall, gather up those old tires and get rid of them for free!

The Regional District of Central Okanagan and its Mosquito Control Program contractor BWP Consulting will provide four free, passenger tire drop-off opportunities in Kelowna and Lake Country.  Any old passenger vehicle tires or transport tractor-trailer tires (no agricultural tires), with or without rims, can be dropped off for recycling on the following dates and locations between 10 am and 3 pm.

Saturday, October 18

• Okanagan College – Parking Lot #17 1000 KLO Road, Kelowna

•   North Glenmore Elementary School – 125 Snowsell Street North, Kelowna

Sunday, October 19

• Swalwell Park – 10070 Bottom Wood Lake Road, Lake Country

•  Casorso Elementary School – 3675 Casorso Road, Kelowna

Residents in the City of Kelowna, District of Lake Country or Central Okanagan East or West Electoral Areas of the regional district that are unable to attend the scheduled events are eligible to arrange for a pick-up of their unwanted tires.

Only residents in those areas should contact BWP Consulting at 1-866-679-TIRE (8473) or email before Oct.19  to schedule a pick-up.

“Just a small amount of water inside any old tires sitting around a property can create the perfect breeding ground for mosquito larvae,” said RDCO communications officer Bruce Smith.   “By safely recycling these unwanted tires at any of our four free, drop-off locations or by having the mosquito control contractor collect these tires from your property, you’ll remove opportunities for mosquitoes to reproduce around your home.  That helps protect your family and neighbours from the nuisance insects and helps reduce the potential risk of spreading West Nile Virus.”

There are excellent resources available to help you and your family during the mosquito season.  Visit the Mosquito Control page on the Regional District website for information about the program.

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