Give a hoot and don’t touch baby birds

SORCO raptor rehab reminds residents to stop before they touch baby bird

Resist the urge to touch baby birds is the message Oliver’s SORCO Raptor Rehab Centre wants people to hear this spring.

Dale Belvedere, manager of the Oliver raptor rehab centre, said raptors including owls, hawks, osprey and falcons have either recently had their young or are about to, and often people see the babies on the ground and reactively think they’re in distress and need help.

“Even though they find them on the ground, they might not be injured. The babies are born three days apart. So, the first born is nine to 12 days older than the youngest. The older ones are ready to fly ahead of the younger ones and what happens is the baby sees the others learning to fly and tries it out and can’t,” she said.

“They fall and people often find them under the tree, in a park, on a sidewalk but they can get back up in the tree using their talons. Once people pick them up and put them in a box, we can’t put them back because the mother and father won’t take care of them.”

Two years ago the rehab centre had to take in 44 great horned owl babies, for what Belvedere calls “basically no reason.”

Related: UDPATE: Owls being treated for suspected Warfarin poisoning

“Usually we might take eight babies a year. We were swamped down here. We want to keep things as natural as we can for the raptors and, although people are good-intentioned, they are actually hurting them by picking them up,” she said.

Belvedere urged people that come across baby raptors (owls, hawks, osprey and falcons) to call SORCO first before they touch the bird to find out what they should do.

She also noted that often SORCO gets calls for other birds and that they really can’t help.

Related: Taste of freedom for owls released in Oliver

“People think we’ll take anything or they are referred to us from different organizations. Unfortunately, they’ve usually been through three or four phone calls and they’re frustrated because all they want to do is help the bird. Raptors are property of the B.C. ministry. Robins and chickadees and other kinds of birds are not endangered and there really isn’t anything we can do,” she said.

SORCO Raptor Rehab was registered as non-profit society in 1998 and is licensed through the Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations. SORCO rehabilitates injured and orphaned birds of prey for release back to the wild and offers a robust educational programming to educate the public about raptors roles. The rehab centre serves the Okanagan Valley and north to Armstrong and south as far as Castlegar.

x

To report a typo, email:
editor@keremeosreview.com
.


@TaraBowieBC
editor@keremeosreview.com


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Police search for suspect in early-morning assault downtown Kelowna

Kelowna police received a report a woman had been assaulted by an unknown man on July 12

Kelowna glider pilot crashes in the Columbia Valley

The Transportation Safety Board is investigating the circumstances of the crash

Gun enthusiasts arrive in Kelowna for the Western Canadian Skeet Championship

The competition will be held from July 17-19, 2020 in Joe Rich

$10,000 to support LGBTQIA2S+ youth in the Okanagan

The endowment has been provided by the First West Foundation

Police keep eye on motorbike gang in Kelowna for poker run

The Throttle Lockers Motorcycle Club Poker Run was to have taken place on July 11

B.C. records 62 new COVID-19 cases, two deaths since Friday

Province has just over 200 active cases

Summerland approves solar project

Despite community opposition, council voted 4-3 for Cartwright Mountain location

‘Trauma equals addiction’ – why some seek solace in illicit substances

Part 2: Many pushed into addiction by ‘toxic stress,’ says White Rock psychologist

Hotel rooms for B.C. homeless too hasty, NDP government told

Businesses forced out, but crime goes down, minister says

Two positive COVID-19 cases at Oliver farm

The risk of exposure to the general public related to this farm is considered to be low

Oliver Town Hall closed to public as staffer displays COVID-19 symptoms

One staff member at Oliver Town Hall is being tested for coronavirus

Wage subsidy will be extended until December amid post-COVID reopening: Trudeau

Trudeau said the extension will ‘give greater certainty and support to businesses’

B.C. government prepares for COVID-19 economic recovery efforts

New measures after July consultation, Carole James says

Horoscopes for the week of July 13

Weekly horoscopes by Morgan Fava

Most Read