Harm reduction, student-led initiatives targeting binge-drinking at Canadian university

Harm reduction, student-led initiatives targeting binge-drinking at Canadian university

University of Toronto, Carleton University in Ottawa are hosting a dry frosh

Reka Rossignol remembers feeling a mix of frustration and fear while trying to get an incoherent friend back to their dorm after a night of drinking during their first year in university.

Campus security at the school in northern Ontario had just informed them that a bear had been spotted nearby and ordered everyone inside. Rossignol asked for help getting home but was told all security could do was call an ambulance for the young woman who was having trouble staying upright — something neither of the two students wanted.

The pair somehow struggled to their beds but, four years later, the memory of the night has stayed with Rossignol.

Binge drinking at the off-campus party like the one they were at was rampant, pressure to get drunk in the first place was high, and support for those who had too much was hard to come by, said the 23-year-old, who uses gender neutral pronouns.

“Everyone was partying on the weekends and everyone was binge drinking,” they said.

“There’s a lot of this toxic kind of culture of having to prove yourself. People want you to prove yourself as being a partier or being a big drinker and the more booze you can take the cooler you are.”

Research suggests binge drinking among youth, and women in particular, may be on the rise, with a recent study indicating a spike in emergency room visits related to alcohol issues by those groups.

Several universities are tackling the issue by reconsidering how they run their orientation week activities, placing harm reduction and an emphasis on students educating students about the risks of binge drinking at the centre of their initiatives.

At Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont., the school has a dry orientation — or frosh — week, as well as campus security and a first aid team available around the clock.

Beth Blackett, health promotion co-ordinator at Queen’s, said educational awareness happens at a peer-to-peer level during the week, with upper-year volunteers teaching new students everything from how to maintain a low blood alcohol concentration to pointers on how to safely pour a standard drink.

“Students, especially, think that others are drinking way more or way more often than they actually are,” said Blackett, who added that students showing other students how to have fun without alcohol can have a positive effect.

ALSO READ: Canadian program providing alcohol to heavy drinkers envied by Scotland

All orientation facilitators and leaders sign contracts promising to remain sober throughout the week and undergo harm-reduction training, she said.

Since 1990, the school has also had an onsite non-medical detox facility called the “campus observation room,” which provides a safe place for students under the influence where they can be monitored by staff.

The University of Toronto’s campus in Mississauga, Ont., has dry orientation programs as well. The school works with student clubs to support them for their events and even pub nights during frosh week are “completely dry,” said Jessica Silver, the director of student engagement on campus.

Carleton University in Ottawa is also hosting a dry frosh, led by roughly 500 facilitators and 100 frosh leaders.

Douglas Cochrane, president of university’s student-run Rideau River Residence Association, said the orientation will try to correct perceived notions of how much university students drink.

“There’s no hiding it, binge drinking does happen on university and college campuses,” said Cochrane. “It’s important for both the university administration and also student organizations such as ourselves to be proactive instead of reactive to these situations.”

Research certainly backs up the anecdotal evidence that binge drinking is an issue among youth.

In July, a study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal looked at patterns in alcohol-related ER visits in Ontario between 2003 and 2016.

The rate of alcohol-related ER visits spiked by 175 per cent among individuals aged 25 to 29. The change was even more pronounced among young women, who saw an increase of 240 per cent, the study showed.

Ann Johnston, who authored the book “Drink: The Intimate Relationship Between Women and Alcohol,” pointed to a shift in cultural norms as an explanation.

It’s more acceptable for women to drink than in the past, she said, with the alcohol industry aiming marketing specifically towards women.

A ”pinking” of the market since the mid-1990s has seen the invention of “alcopop” drinks like Mike’s Hard Lemonade, Skinnygirl Cocktails and Smirnoff Ice that are typically aimed at young women, she noted.

“In our culture we drink to celebrate, relax, reward and we are completely sold on the notion that alcohol is a great way to unwind,” she said.

Johnston, who also co-founded the advocacy group the National Roundtable on Girls, Women and Alcohol, said the way to combat the issue is to increase awareness of low-risk drinking guidelines and scale back access to alcohol.

“There are three leaders that you can push on: marketing, accessibility, and pricing,” she said. ”That changes the way a population drinks.”

Emerald Bensadoun, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Interior Health nurses were administering COVID-19 vaccines to seniors and care aides in Kelowna on Tuesday, March 16. (Phil McLachlan/Capital News)
Fine issued after Kelowna martial arts academy bans mask-wearers, vaccinated patrons

Interior Health has issued a ticket to Flow Academy for non-compliance with public health orders

A worker is seen dismantling the damaged crane on April 13. (Aaron Hemens - Kelowna Capital News)
Crews dismantle crane damaged in Glenmore Construction fire

The crane expected to be removed by the end of the day

The Okanagan Forest Task Force’s only means of getting garbage out of the backcountry broke down on Tuesday, April 6. (Kane Blake - Okanagan Forest Task Force)
Okanagan forest cleanup group’s truck repaired free of charge

Okanagan Forest Task Force uses the truck to haul garbage out of the backcountry

Lime e-scooters will soon be offered in Kelowna. (Photo: Kris Krug)
E-scooters now allowed on Kelowna roadways under provincial pilot program

‘Rather than a novelty, this change will enable e-scooters to be used for more utilitarian transportation purposes’

(Aaron Hemens - Kelowna Capital News)
Man found tangled in barbed wire on trail near UBC Okanagan

Man’s friend claims he’d been drinking when he went missing Monday afternoon

Burnaby MLA Raj Chouhan presides as Speaker of the B.C. legislature, which opened it spring session April 12 with a speech from the throne. THE CANADIAN PRESS
B.C. NDP promises more health care spending, business support in 2021 budget

John Horgan government to ‘carefully return to balanced budgets’

A five-storey, 60-unit building has been proposed for 8709 Jubilee Rd. E., Summerland. The proposal will be the subject of a public hearing on March 22. (Image by GTA Architecture)
Zoning, OCP amendments adopted for Summerland housing development

Additional variances will be needed for controversial five-storey, 60-unit housing development

Guinevere, lovingly referred to by Jackee Sullivan and her family as Gwenny, is in need of a gynecological surgery. The family is raising money to help offset the cost of the procedure. (Jackee Sullivan/Special to Langley Advance Times)
Langley lizard’s owners raise funds for gynecological surgery

The young reptile is scheduled for operation on Tuesday

Facebook screenshot of the sea lion on Holberg Road. (Greg Clarke Facebook video)
VIDEO: Sea lion randomly spotted on remote B.C. logging road

Greg Clarke was driving home on the Holberg Road April 12, when he saw a large sea lion.

Defence counsel for the accused entered two not guilty pleas by phone to Grand Forks Provincial Court Tuesday, Jan. 12. File photo
B.C. seafood company owner fined $25K for eating receipt, obstructing DFO inspection

Richmond company Tenshi Seafood is facing $75,000 in fines as decided March 4 by a provincial court judge

B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson speaks in the B.C. legislature, March 2, 2021. (Hansard TV)
B.C. NDP ministers defend ‘air tax,’ latest COVID-19 business aid

Empty home tax doesn’t apply to businesses, but space above them

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Sheila Derbyshire surprised her daughter, Talyn, at Len Wood Middle School in Armstrong April 12, 2021, for her 13th birthday with 13 clowns carrying 13 red balloons. (Sheila Derbyshire - Contributed)
Armstrong mom sends in the clowns

‘Halloween freak’ celebrates daughter’s 13th birthday in style

Air Canada cancelled service to and from Penticton Jan. 11, 2021. After receving $5.9 billion in federal aid the airline is now set to renew service on the route in June, 2021. (Mark Brett - Western News file)
Air Canada flights set to return to the South Okanagan

Federal aid could have the Vancouver/Penticton route back to pre-pandemic service

Most Read